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Round Patchwork Floor Cushion with Tufting

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Floral on the floor! Who says tables and counters get to have all the fun when it comes to gorgeous bouquets of blooms. We used nine floral prints from Amy Butler's Violette collection for FreeSpirit Fabrics to create a beautiful patchwork floor cushion for your seat or feet, giving new meaning to "tiptoe through the tulips!" We offer pattern downloads for all the patchwork pieces so you don't have to blow a gasket trying to turn squares and rectangles into a perfect circle; we did all the math for you. 

Amy describes Violette as a "lush collection of French-inspired deco graphics mixed with modern flora and fauna. The bright, fresh colors are inspired by farmer's market visits and the inherent natural beauty of the French countryside."

"Lush" really does describe this collection; it's dense with saturated color and layered designs. We always love how Amy is able to blend motifs of varying size and complexity within one collection. The resulting mélange gives you so many great options for mixing and matching. 

Although the top, bottom and sides are all traditionally pieced, we did not use a traditional ¼" quilting seam allowance. Because a floor cushion is likely to get rougher treatment in its role as extra seating or a foot rest, we felt a full ½" allowance offered better seam strength throughout.

We suggest medium density 5" upholstery foam for this project, and recommend you get the circle professionally cut. This insures a true circle and "sitting-quality" foam. You can cut a circle from a block of foam, but don't try to do it freehand; use the assembled top or bottom of the cushion to cut a paper pattern. The nice man who cut our foam said a bread knife with tight serrations is the best tool to use at home, although an electric carving knife also works well. 

Our nine print selections come from within all three of the wonderful color palettes of VioletteTreasureFlourish and Portrait. To create your own unique patchwork, check out our helpful article: Top 10 Designer Tips for Blending Colors and Prints.

Violette is not a brand new collection, but is still available through many outlets. The links below within the supply list take you to the selection from our friends at Hawthorne Threads. 

Our floor cushion finishes at approximately 24" in diameter x 5" deep, excluding the piping.

Sewing Tools You Need

  • Sewing Machine and standard presser foot
  • Zipper foot
  • Walking or Even Feed footoptional, but the thick layers of fabric and batting can be a challenge without it - If you machine has a built-in feeding systems, such as the great AcuFeed™ Flex fabric feeding system on the Janome models, this is another option 

Fabric and Other Supplies

The finished look of our pretty cushion is thanks to our unique "spring bouquet" combination of nine fabrics from Amy Butler's Violette collection. We evaluated a number of options to create a cohesive color palette of complementary colors with a pleasing mix of motif scale that helps to define the patchwork pattern. We will refer to these fabrics throughout the instructions below. To create your own look in a different collection, check out our helpful article: Top 10 Designer Tips for Blending Colors and Prints.

Getting Started

NOTE: In order to create two perfect circles without stress, we've provided patterns for all the top/bottom pieces. Pieces 1-4, 6 and 9 are each made up of two parts. Pieces 5 and 7 are each a single pattern. And, Piece 8 is two individual patterns (8a and 8b) that, when the final two half circles are sewn together, form what looks like one continuous horizontal rectangle. 

  1. Download and print out ONE copy of the SIXTEEN PAGE pattern set: Tufted Cushion Pattern. These pages have been bundled into ONE PDF file to make the download easier.
    IMPORTANT: All pattern pages are ONE 8½" x 11" sheets. You must print this multi-page PDF file at 100%. DO NOT SCALE to fit the page. There is a guide rule on each page so you can confirm your final printout is to scale.
  2. Cut out each pattern piece along the solid line. 
  3. Butt together (do not overlap) the SIX appropriate pairs (1-4, 6, 9) along the solid center lines (marked with the double arrows). Tape together to create each full pattern piece. 
  4. Below is an illustration showing how the patterns lay out. The top and the bottom of the cushion have the same configuration, but with different fabrics.
  5. As you move through the steps, use these illustrations to keep track of which cuts go where for the top and bottom, as well as for the long side strip.
  6. From the fabrics, cut the following:

    Garden Fete in Midnight
    :
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #1
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #7
    Cut ONE 11" wide x 6" high rectangle
    Cut ONE 6" x 6" square
    Leaf Lines in Jade:
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #2
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #9
    Cut ONE 6" x 6" square
    Camellia in Crush:
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #6
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #8a
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #8b
    Cut ONE 11" wide x 6" high rectangle
    Organic Stripe in Pine:
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #7
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #3
    Cut ONE 6" x 6" square
    Meadow Blooms in Minty:
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #8a
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #8b
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #4
    Cut TWO 11" wide x 6" high rectangles
    Garden Fete in Grass:
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #2
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #4
    Cut ONE 6" x 6" square
    Town Center in Azure:
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #9
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #5
    Cut ONE 6" x 6" square
    Field Poppy in Rose:
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #5
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #6
    Cut ONE 11" wide x 6" high rectangle
    Twilight Vine in Sky:
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #3
    Cut ONE, using pattern piece #1
  7. From the coordinating cotton for the piping, cut enough 2" wide bias strips to yield at least 160" of piping. 
    NOTE: If you are new to working with bias strips for piping, take a look at our detailed tutorial, How To Make and Attach Piping. 
  8. From the cotton webbing, cut ONE 11" length. 
  9. The high-loft batting and the piping cord will be cut to fit during the construction steps.

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

Create the top/bottom circles

NOTE: Remember, all seam allowances at figured at ½", not the traditional ¼" quilting seam allowance. 

  1. Lay out the pieces to form the finished circle. This will help you keep track of everything in an orderly fashion.
  2. For the cushion top, you'll start by constructing the left half of the circle. Find pieces #1 and #2. 
  3. Place the two pieces right sides together along the inner edges. Also align the straight bottom corners, which means there will be a small point from piece #1 extending beyond piece #2 at the top curve. This is correct. Pin in place.
  4. Stitch together, using a ½" seam allowance. Press the seam allowance towards piece #1.
  5. Find piece #6. Place it right sides together with assembled piece #1/2, aligning the base of #1/2 with the top of #6. Pin in place.
  6. Stitch together. Press the seam allowance towards piece #6.  
  7. Find pieces #7 and #8a. Place the two pieces right sides together along the inner edges. Also align the straight top corners, which means there will be a small point from piece #7 extending beyond piece #8a at the bottom curve. This is correct. Pin in place.
  8. Stitch together. Press the seam allowance towards piece #8a.
  9. To complete the left half of the top circle, align the top edge of assembled piece #7/8a right sides together with the bottom edge of piece #6. Pin in place, then stitch together and press the seam allowance down toward #7/8a.
  10. To construct the right half of the top circle, first find pieces #4 and #8b. Place the two pieces right sides together, aligning the short inner edges. Pin in place, then stitch together. Press the seam allowance down toward piece #8b.
  11. Find pieces #5 and #9. Place the two pieces right sides together, aligning the short inner edges. Pin in place, then stitch together. Press the seam allowance down toward piece #9.
  12. Place the assembled #4/8b piece and the assembled #5/9 piece right sides together, aligning the long vertical inner edges. As above, align the top straight corners, creating a small excess "ear" along the bottom curve. Pin in place, then stitch together. Press the seam allowance toward piece #5/9.
  13. To complete the right half of the top circle, align the top edge of assembled pieces right sides together with the bottom edge of piece #3. Pin in place, then stitch together and press the seam allowance down.
  14. Place the two completed half circles right sides together. Your alignment guide are pieces #8a and #8b. Make sure these two pieces are perfectly in line so they will appear as one horizontal piece after seaming. 
  15. Pin in place, then stitch in place, using a ½" seam allowance, from the top to the bottom. Press the seam allowance together and to the left.
  16. Repeat to create the identical bottom patchwork circle from the remaining fabric cuts. You'll use the same process, just with different fabric. Refer to the drawings above to confirm.

Create the side panel

  1. Find all the side rectangles and squares and the 11" length of webbing. 
  2. Find the center 11" rectangle (Camellia in Crush in our sample). Place it right side up and flat on your work surface. Place the 11" length of webbing across the rectangle, centering it top to bottom. Pin the webbing in place. 
  3. Following our diagram above, assemble the long side panel with its alternating squares and rectangles. We worked from the from the center rectangle (Camellia in Crush). First assembling to the right:
    6" x 6" Garden Fete in Grass
    11" x 6" Meadow Blooms in Minty
    6" x 6" Garden Fete in Midnight
    11" x 6" Field Poppy in Rose
    6" x 6" Town Center in Azure
  4. Then assembling from the center rectangle to the left:
    6" x 6" Leaf Lines in Jade
    11" x 6" Garden Fete in Midnight
    6" x 6" Organic Stripe in Pine
    11" x 6" Meadow Blooms in Minty
  5. Pin each piece in place, right sides together, then stitch together with a ½" seam allowance. Press all the seam allowances open and flat.
  6. Flip over to the right side and stitch a 1" X-box at each end of the webbing handle. We lengthened our stitch and switched to a heavy thread.
    NOTE: We have an X Box Tutorial if you are new to this technique. 

Create and attach the piping

  1. Stitch the 2" bias strips together end to end to create one, super long (apx 160") length. As mentioned above, if you are new to working with bias cuts for piping, we have a great tutorial.
  2. Find the matching length of piping cord.
  3. Re-thread the machine with thread to match the piping fabric in the top and bobbin.
  4. Wrap the fabric around the piping cord. Align the raw edges of the fabric and pin in place. 
  5. Attach a Zipper foot.
  6. Secure the fabric in place around the cording with a basting stitch, running your seam as close to the cording as possible. Go slowly; it's important the raw edges of the fabric stay even with one another.
  7. When the piping is complete, cut it into TWO equal 80" lengths.
  8. Find the top circle. Place it right side up and flat on your work surface.
  9. Pin a length of piping around all the entire circle, aligning the raw edges of the piping with the raw edge of the fabric. Leave an overlap of about 2" free at the tail of the piping.
  10. Use your seam ripper to reveal the cord of the free tail. Cut the end so it will butt together flush with the head of the cording. 
  11. Fold back the raw edge of the cording tail fabric by about ½" - ¾". Butt together the two ends of the cording and wrap the tail fabric over the head fabric so the piping lays flat against the main circle. Pin in place. 
  12. With the Zipper foot still attached, machine baste the piping in place around the top circle. 
    NOTE: Remember, if you are new to attaching piping, check out our full piping tutorial.
  13. Repeat to attach the remaining length of piping to the right side of the bottom circle. 

Bond the fabric to the batting

  1. You may want to cover your work surfaces with paper or plastic when working with spray adhesive.
  2. Place the high loft batting on the floor or on a separate area of your work surface. 
  3. Flip the finished top circle (with the piping in place) so it is wrong side up and flat on your work surface. Lightly spray the wrong side of the fabric with fabric spray adhesive. 
  4. Lay the top circle adhesive side down on the batting. Lightly press to insure the fabric circle is nice and flat. 
  5. Trim the batting along the edge of the fabric circle. 
  6. If possible, engage your machine's built-in fabric feeding system or attach a Walking or Even Feed foot.
  7. Using a ⅜" seam allowance, machine baste all around through all the layers. 
  8. Trim the batting back to the basting seam line. 
  9. Repeat to bond batting to the bottom circle. 
  10. Find the side panel strip. 
    NOTE: As mentioned above, we used 96" wide batting and so could cut one continuous 76" batting strip to fit the side panel. You may need to cut two 38" lengths of batting and bond them one at a time. If you do this, you may also want to secure the center ends together with a few hand stitches.
  11. Follow the same steps to stray fabric adhesive to the back of the fabric side panel, then flip it over to adhere the fabric panel to the batting. 
  12. Bring the raw ends together to form a loop. Stitch the ends together, using a ½" seam allowance.
  13. Trim the batting back as close to the seam allowance as possible. 

Attach the side loop to the top and bottom circles

  1. Place the top circle right side up and flat on your work surface.
  2. Find the side loop. Turn it wrong side out.
  3. Match the side ring to the circle, centering the handle over the top center seam of the patchwork. Pin your way around the circle. You are working right sides together, aligning the raw edges and sandwiching the piping between the layers. Yes, you are working with two layers of squishy batting; use plenty of pins. 
  4. If necessary, you can clip into the edge of the loop slightly to allow it to ease along the curve of the top. Pin generously as you go. 
  5. Sew around the entire edge with an approximate ½" seam allowance – approximate because the goal is simply to stay as close to the piping as possible. Go slowly and keep your seam consistent. Continue to use your machine's built-in feeding system or a Walking or Even feed foot to help keep the layers of lofty batting under control. 
  6. Place the remaining bottom circle right sides together with the bottom raw edge of the side ring. As above, you are working right sides together, aligning the raw edges and sandwiching the piping between the layers. 
    NOTE: When assembling a top and bottom to a side loop, it can help to think about it like setting a lid upside down into a box.
  7. As above, pin generously as you go around, leaving an 18" opening to insert the foam. 
  8. As above, sew around this circle with an approximate ½" seam allowance, staying as close to the piping as possible. Remember to lock your seam on either side of the 18" opening.
  9. Turn right side out through the opening. Lightly press. 

Insert the foam circle and tuft

  1. Find the foam circle. Fold it in half and compress it as best you can. Insert it through the opening. Once inside, let it gently unfold, then adjust the foam into position against the side wall of the circle. It may pick up a bit of the batting as you adjust it into place. This is fine. 
  2. With the cushion upside down, pull down the circle and pull up the side panel. 
  3. Fold back the raw edge of the side panel at the opening so it is flush with the sewn seam, and pin in place up against the piping.
  4. Thread a hand sewing needle and hand stitch the opening closed with tiny, even stitches.
  5. Thread a long upholstery needle with a long, double strand of the extra strong, waxed upholstery thread. 
  6. Keep the cushion bottom side facing up. This is the side where all the knots will be. They are small and somewhat hidden into the tufting, but they will still show a bit.
  7. Follow our drawing above to mark the nine tufting points. There is one in the exact center. The remaining eight are evenly spaced 6" apart and, as shown above, several of the points match with a patchwork corner. 
  8. Starting at the center tufting point, insert the needle ¼" to one side of the marked point. 
  9. Firmly push the needle through until it comes out the top at the same point. 
  10. Push the needle back in ¼" to the other side of the marked point. 
  11. Pull the needle and thread through to the bottom side. Repeat, going up through and back down once more.
  12. Firmly grasp the ends of the thread and cinch up to create a dimple in the foam. Knot once, then continue pulling until you get the tufting depth that is to your liking. 
  13. Knot two more times to secure then trim away the excess thread. 
  14. Repeat to create a matching tuft at each of the remaining eight points, working from the center out.

    NOTE: Depending on the density of your foam, it may help to have an extra set of hands for this step. One person can push to compress the foam, and the other can pull the thread and knot. 

Contributors

Project Design: Alicia Thommas
Sample Creation and Instructional Outline: Debbie Guild 

Section: 

Comments (13)

B said:
B's picture

I really like this pattern. Do you think that this could be made with faux suede?  

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@B -- Isn't this a pretty cushion?! Thanks! You should be okay with faux suede as long as it's lightweight.

Deanna Watson said:
Deanna Watson's picture

I  love this cushion and will make one as soon as I am all moved in and settled. My Great Grandson will love to sit on it to watch his cartoon show.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Deanna - Thank you! Your great grandson will love it!

AnnetteH said:
AnnetteH's picture

Can't wait to try this project!  Would I have your permission to teach a class using your pattern?  You would get the credit, of course.  I think the ladies at our store would love this!!

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@AnnetteH - So glad you love the cushion! All our S4H projects and patterns are copyrighted - so we do appreciate you asking permission. Paid classes are not an option, but please send a note to info@sew4home.com and we can review your specific request. 

Tanna said:
Tanna's picture

I love it.  Cutest thing and so useful and portable!  Am I the only one to think "place to park new puppy for a nap while I sew?"  I can see two coming up.  One for my office desk and one for my sewing room desk.  Thanks!

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Tanna - A "puppy perch" - what an excellent idea. Make sure to post a photo of your finished pair - we'd love to see. If you're on social media, we're sew4home on Facebook and Pinterest, sew4home_diy on Instagram.

Evy Hawkins said:
Evy Hawkins's picture

This is so cute! And FINALLY, a tuffet without hardware that I have to find, yay! Thanks for this awesome project!

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Evy - Thank you - I've not seen a cushion with hardware before -- so now we're both amazed  Have fun with the project and be sure to let us know how yours turns out. 

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Janet - Thank you! Let us know how yours turns out. We'd love to see a picture on Facebook (sew4home) or Instagram (sew4home_diy)!

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