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You can never have too many baby bed linens. Changing the crib several times in one day is not unheard of… let’s just say babies are kind of “leaky.” This super simple crib sheet takes just a couple yards of fabric, a length of elastic and about an hour of your time. Why settle for boring old white sheets when it’s so easy to add color and design? Today’s project is just one of eight pieces in our new nursery series sponsored by our good friends at Michael Miller Fabrics, and is created using their new Color Story concept. Unlike most fabric collections that are filled with coordinated prints in multiple colorways, color is what this story is all about, like our selection: Citron-Gray. This baby nursery has a sleek, modern style yet is still wrap-your-arms-around-it warm and cozy.

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You can never have too many baby bed linens. Changing the crib several times in one day is not unheard of… let’s just say babies are kind of “leaky.” This super simple crib sheet takes just a couple yards of fabric, a length of elastic and about an hour of your time. Why settle for boring old white sheets when it’s so easy to add color and design? Today’s project is just one of eight pieces in our new nursery series sponsored by our good friends at Michael Miller Fabrics, and is created using their new Color Story concept. Unlike most fabric collections that are filled with coordinated prints in multiple colorways, color is what this story is all about, like our selection: Citron-Gray. This baby nursery has a sleek, modern style yet is still wrap-your-arms-around-it warm and cozy.

This project is sized for a standard 52″ x 28″ x 6″ deep crib mattress and is based on an original tutorial by Joanna Armour for Michael Miller Fabrics.

Michael Miller’s Color Story concept combines hues that consistently work so well together, they create their own ambience, their own feeling… their own story. These fabric color pairings are also currently prominent in other areas of fashion, interior style and pop culture: Citron-Gray, Aqua-Red, Cocoa-Berry, It’s a Boy thing, It’s a Girl Thing, Lagoon, Orchid-Gray, Retro, Rouge et Noir, Sorbet and Urban Grit.

Like good friends who hang together over time, Michael Miller’s eleven Color Story pals will evolve from one release to another. Their stories will update and build momentum as color trends evolve, but their compatibility will remain. You’ll be able to add new fabrics within the same Color Story, knowing they’ll fit in and work well together.

Welcome to the Citron-Gray Color Story and our custom baby boy nursery. It’s a story with a very happy ending.

For more baby projects, take a look at our original Shower Power Baby Gifts.

Sewing Tools You Need

Fabric and Other Supplies

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Where to Buy

Michael Miller Fabrics recommends the following online retailers as great places to shop for and buy the beautiful fabrics within the Citron-Gray Color Story as well as many other Michael Miller collections:

Hancock’s of Paducah: 10% discount on Michael Miller Citron-Gray Color Story fabric. Use promo code: Citrongrey

Fat Quarter Shop

Quilt Home

Fabric Depot

CityCraft Online

Hawthorne Threads

Fabricworm

Getting Started

  1. From your fabric, cut ONE rectangle 45″ wide x 69″ long. For most fabrics, this will mean that you use the entire width of the fabric, including the selvedge.
  2. Using your see-through ruler (or a square you’ve drawn and cut from paper as a pattern), draw an 8″ x 8″ square at each corner of your fabric rectangle.
  3. Cut out the 8″ x 8″ square from each corner.
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At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

  1. This crib sheet features enclosed French Seams. This step is not required, but we recommend it since crib sheets get washed frequently. An enclosed French Seam helps prevent raveling and gives the inside of your sheet a nice, finished look.
  2. We have a tutorial about this technique and other machine sewn finishes.
  3. To make each corner’s French Seam, first fold the corners WRONG sides together. You are matching the raw edges of each corner cut, which will create a little “triangle fold” in the fabric at the inside point of the seam. Pin in place.
  4. Stitch, using a ¼” seam, wrong sides together from top to bottom.Trim down the finished seam allowance to 1/8″.
  5. Make this seam at each corner.
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  6. When all four corners are finished, turn the sheet wrong side out (right sides together), and re-pin each corner for an additional seam. You are making the same four seams, but now the fabric is right sides together and you will be encasing your original seam in the new seam. Pin each corner seam in place.
  7. Using a ¼” seam allowance, stitch together from top to bottom.  
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Create the casing tunnel for the elastic

  1. To create the casing tunnel, make a 3/8″ double-fold hem. To do this, fold under 3/8″ and press all around the bottom raw edge, then fold under and press an additional 3/8″.
  2. Edgestitch close to the inner fold all the way around, leaving an approximate 2-3″ opening between you starting and ending points. This is where you will insert the elastic. Remember to lock your seams at both ends, ie. at either side of the opening.
  3. Cut the elastic to a 60″ length.
    NOTE: We used 60″ of elastic for our sample. Some folks who have made the sheet recommend using the full 2 yards (72″).
  4. Attach a safety pin to one end of the elastic. Slide the safety pin into the opening of the casing and work it all the way around until it comes out again through the opening. Gather the fabric along the length of the elastic as you go, so the unpinned end of the elastic does not accidentally get pulled inside the tunnel. It also helps to hold on to 6″- 8″ of the unpinned elastic end to keep it from slipping into the casing
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  5. When the safety pin comes out of the other side of the tunnel opening, remove the safety pin and overlap the two ends 2″- 3″. Pin in place (or just hold the ends together), and secure with several rows of zigzag stitching. Be generous with your stitching so the elastic ends do not pull apart. You want to be able to stretch the sheet over and over again; baby linens get changed a lot !
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  6. Pull the tunnel hem straight so the remainder of the elastic disappears inside the tunnel.
  7. Edgestitch the tunnel opening closed, matching your new seam to the start and end points of the existing seam.

Contributors

Project Concept: Alicia Thommas
Sample Creation and Instructional Outline: Gregory Dickson

Other machines suitable for this project include the Elna 2800 Pink and the Viking Emerald 203.

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