Years ago the Thermos® company had the slogan, “Keeps hot things hot and cold things cold.” You can’t say it much better than that. Did you know there are fabrics that help you do the same thing? These aren’t the heavy industrial materials that keep steelworkers, astronauts, and firefighters safe, but honest-to-goodness fabrics you can actually sew with.

Thermal fabrics are useful for all kinds of projects where you want to keep hot stuff hot and cold stuff cold, such as pot holders and oven mitts, table pads, lunch carriers, shopping totes, ironing board pads, outdoor stadium cushions, tea cozies, and many other items.

And, because of the metallic coatings common to many of types, and the fact that they’re easy to sew, you can even use them to make some pretty creative costumes – from medieval armor to Lady Gaga!

The options fall into three basic categories:

  • Thermal Batting, which has insulating properties.
  • Thermal Fabric, which can withstand high temperatures without scorching.
  • Thermal Interfacing, which is a lighter weight insulating option.

An important note about microwaving: The materials listed below that have a metallic layer specifically say, “Do not microwave.” None of the rest actually state they are safe to microwave either. So for any kind of thermal fabric, unless it specifically says it’s microwavable, we recommend you don’t risk it. One exception, described at the end of this page, is Wrap-N-Zap by Pellon, which is specifically designed to be microwaved.

Thermal Batting

Insul-Bright

The thermal batting product that’s been around the longest is Insul-Bright from The Warm Company. It’s made with hollow, polyester fibers that have been needle-punched through a non-woven substrate, and then through a reflective metalized poly film. The needled material is breathable. The hollow fibers insulate by resisting conduction. And the metalized poly film resists radiant energy by reflecting it back to its source.

It contains no resins or glues and will not shift, migrate, or bend. You could use it in clothing, but it would be rather noisy. However, babies and animals often love the noise and like to scrunch it up in soft books and toys.

Insul-Bright is machine washable, easy to cut to size, and apart from being just a bit slippery, is quite nice to work with. Most sources offer it by the yard in 22″ and 45″ widths, and a few outlets offer 36″ x 45″ pre-cuts.

Even though we’ve listed this material in the ‘batting’ category, The Warm Company does suggest considering two layers or layering Insul-Bright with a standard cotton batting if you are using it for a high-heat application.

A number of sources offer Insul-Bright online, including Fabric.com. It’s also readily available at many local fabric and craft stores.

Insul-Shine

This space-age thermal batting from The Warm Company was originally designed for insulating air conditioning ducts or wrapping your hot water heater (for which it’s very effective). But Insul-Shine is actually quite sewable.

You can make something simple, like a reflective visor for your car or to put in your RV windows to prevent sun damage. If you’re looking for a mod metallic look, you could also use it to cover a headboard, throw pillows, or make a budding astronaut very happy with some rocket wall art.

Insul-Shine has two layers, reflective material and insulating polyester batting. The metal surface wipes clean and actually acts as a water barrier for soft coolers, diaper bags, and bottle carriers.

It is washable, but doing this may dull the reflective side. Sold in 22″ and 45″ widths.

You can find it at Amazon and Fabric.com among others.

Solarize

Solarize, a thermal product by Fairfield, is a uniquely thin metallic insulating fabric. Less noisy and crinkly than other offerings, Solarize still creates a strong thermal barrier that keeps things hot or cold. And it works with the shiny side in or out – you choose. Keep the shiny side exposed to help conduct heat or reflect light.

It is a sew-in product, made of 50% polyester + 50% aluminum, and the standard width is 22”. You can purchase it as yardage or get it in a “grab-and-go” pre-cut package of 22” x ¾ yd.

Use Solarize inside pillows, fabric scarves, mittens, jackets, hats, and blankets for added warmth. Add it to casserole carriers, potholders, and trivets.  Cool things down by Solarizing inside can cozies, thermal freezer bags, or ice pack wraps.

You can purchase Solarize directly from Fairfield or find it Walmart and other retailers. You can also buy full bolts from Amazon.

Thermal Fabric

Iron Quick

Iron Quick is a specialty fabric made of 100% aluminum with 100% cotton backing. It’s designed to protect from heat (up to 399˚), but does not have any insulating properties so it’s long been the go-to choice for things like ironing board covers.

When you need insulating as well as heat protection, like in your oven mitts, Iron Quick also comes as a quilted material. This is simply the regular Iron Quick fabric with a 100% cotton backing, plus polyester batting and a polyester/cotton backing. This doesn’t afford a huge amount of insulation, but you could use more than one layer or add a layer of regular or thermal batting.

Both varieties come in the same 45″ width. When sewing, you should use a size 80/12 needle.

Neither Iron Quick products should ever be used in the microwave.

Both can be machine washed but should then be air dried – not tossed in the dryer. You can also use a damp cloth to wipe clean.

We found it a bit hard to source online. Retail outlets may be able to help you order it. Nancy’s Notions does carry the non-quilted Iron Quick products by the bolt.

Therma Flec

Therma Flec is a lightweight, heat resistant cloth similar to the Iron Quick but made from 80% cotton/20% polyester. It is scorch-proof to 360˚, but like the Iron Quick cloth, does not provide insulation. However, also like the Iron Quick, you can find Therma Flec in a quilted version for items such as hot pads, oven mitts or ironing board pads.

Both the flat cloth and the quilted option are available in two colors: silver and light gold, all in a 43-44″ width. Don’t put this product in the microwave.

We found Therma Flec in silver to be more readily available, finishing it at Amazon and Vogue Fabrics.

Thermal Interfacing

Thinsulate

Back in the 1980s, the 3M Company introduced an amazing new insulating material called Thinsulate. Ounce for ounce it had one and a half times the warmth of down and twice the warmth of other high-loft insulation materials. It meant you could get sleek ski gloves that were just as warm as giant, puffy mittens.

A quarter century later, Thinsulate is still amazing. Made from microfibers that are only a tenth the size of of other synthetic insulation, it’s much more effective at reflecting back heat. And Thinsulate absorbs less than 1% of its weight in water, allowing it to retain its insulating ability even in damp conditions. You can use it in any kind of project where you want to keep warm but don’t want a lot of bulk, such as jackets and blankets.

You can get varying densities of Thinsulate, depending on the weight and R-value (insulating property) you want, from 1.6 up to 2.9.

Thinsulate is machine washable and dry cleanable once you have sewn it inside your project. It is a bit tough to find as yardage, but we did locate Thinsulate online at Vogue Fabric Store and The Rain Shed. It’s available by the yard, 60″ wide.

Thermolam

 

Pellon makes a 100% polyester interfacing called Thermolam, which is a needle-punched fleece with a protective scrim that can provide some warmth. It’s available by the yard at a 45″ width as both a sew-in or a fusible and is machine washable. It’s considered a heavy-weight in the general world of interfacing, however, it doesn’t have any loft, so it isn’t a choice for projects that call for high-level insulating and/or padded properties.

There’s no microwave warning for this fabric, but then again, we couldn’t find anything that said it was okay to use either. Maybe you should just forget the microwave, huh?

Fabric.com offers a good selection on Thermolam (both sew-in and fusible).

Wrap-N-Zap

Wrap-N-Zap by Pellon is the only thermal product mentioned on this page that we can safely declare to be microwave safe. It’s got Zap in its name and it says “Microwave Friendly!” right on the package.

Made from 100% cotton batting, without glues or other chemicals that could leach into foods, Wrap-N-Zap is designed for projects like insulated baked potato bags and casserole warmers – situations where you heat up the food inside the cover and leave the cover on to keep food warm.

You can machine wash Wrap-N-Zap after you’ve sewn it into a project, but you should only use cotton fabrics, threads, and trims to insure it retains its full microwave-safe designation.

We found it at Fabric.com as a 45″ x 1 yard package and at 22″ wide on a 10 yard bolt.

Thermal fabrics are a “hot” trend

When we first researched this topic several years ago, we could only find about four kinds of thermal fabric or batting that was sewable and relatively easy to locate as yardage. Now we’re finding a lot more options. And we didn’t even include all the new energy-saving materials you can sew into things like super thermal window shades. It’s nice to see the selection growing.

Be adventurous and try some projects that are made to keep hot things hot, and cold things cold. Below are a few Sew4Home projects to get you started:

Casserole Carrier

Insulated Baby Bottle Carrier

Lunch Bag

Picnic Tote

And, of course, all kinds of hot pads and oven mitts.

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242 Comments
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Suzie
Suzie
4 days ago

Could I repurpose an insulated grocery bag into a self-warming cat mat?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
4 days ago
Reply to  Suzie

Hi Suzie – We haven’t created anything like that so we can’t give you a guaranteed response based on hands-on experience. In general, cats can turn just about any layers of bedding warm 🙂 just from their body temperature. I can’t think of a reason why re-purposing an insulated bag would be a problem. Just wrap it in other soft and cozy layers. A benefit of the bag is that is might be a little “crunchy sounded” – a noise that many kitties like.

Sandi
Sandi
27 days ago

I want to make a coffee cozie. Which product would be the best and easiest too sew with? Keep hot coffee hot and iced coffee cold.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
26 days ago
Reply to  Sandi

Hi Sandi – for our own coffee cozie projects, we’ve used a layer of the Insul-Bright.

Toni T Nn Hill
Toni T Nn Hill
3 months ago

What should I use to put in a quilt or blanket that will be used to keep warm while watching a football game on Cleveland Ohio in the winter

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
3 months ago
Reply to  Toni T Nn Hill

Hi Toni – I don’t have ONE perfect answer, it depends quite a bit on what the exterior layers of your blanket are/will be made of. Several of the metallic products listed here can be “crinkly” – something you might not like in a blanket. If that’s the case, one of the thermal fabrics would be better. In addition, a layer of good ol’ wool could be great if getting wet is not an issue. Finally – you could even get one of those off-the-shelf space blankets, which tend to be quite thin, and layer that in quilt batting, thermal… Read more »

Shanice
Shanice
3 months ago

I’m looking for a fabric I can put in a freezer that will keep bottles cold. Any recommendations?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
3 months ago
Reply to  Shanice

Hi Shanice – I’m a little confused because if the bottles are going into a freezer, won’t the freezer itself do the job of keeping the bottles cold? Are you wanting something to put in a carrier, like an ice chest? If os, one or two layers of the Insul-Bright would work well for insulating. For the exterior fabric, you want a waterproof fabric – like an Outdoor fabric or waterproof canvas, or a sport vinyl of some sort. We have a local company here in the PNW that specializes in outdoor fabric, hardware, and kits. They might have some… Read more »

Jean Aldworth
Jean Aldworth
3 months ago

Looking for a fabric that I can sew a cover for our camper van to stop condensation on the windscreen at night ….. any suggestions please….preferably able to be put on outside.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
3 months ago
Reply to  Jean Aldworth

Hi Jean – That is a pretty specialized project that we’ve not attempted before so I really don’t have a knowledgeable suggestion for you. In general, I think you’d want a waterproof fabric – something specifically for outdoor projects. We have a local company here in the PNW that specializes in outdoor fabric, hardware, and kits. They might have some really good options to review. If you can use their stuff to make tents and jackets and sleeping bags, you could certainly fashion a windshield cover. https://www.therainshed.com/

Share Kilpatrick
Share Kilpatrick
4 months ago

What would you use to make a flat iron case? What should it be on the outside and some sort of thermal interior so you could put the iron in it when it’s still warm.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
4 months ago

Hi Share – The Insul-Bright would be our choice for that type of project. I’ve linked below to our flat iron case. For it, we used quilting cotton for the exterior and cotton twill for the interior. You could also consider a wool for the interior.
https://sew4home.com/flat-iron-curling-iron-travel-case/

deb
deb
5 months ago

Hi great article. We are trying to make cooler bags to use in our cars and take with us to the kiddos sports things. Which of the fabrics would be the best to keep food cool or cold?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
5 months ago
Reply to  deb

Hi Deb – thank you; we’re glad you found us. We tend to go with one or two layers of Insul-Bright between the exterior and lining fabrics of good totes. Here’s one on of our tote examples: https://sew4home.com/zippered-picnic-tote-with-lots-o-pockets-inside-out/

deb
deb
5 months ago
Reply to  Liz Johnson

thanks

Laurel
Laurel
5 months ago

This is a great article. I’m looking for the best fabric that would take on heat if it was heated and retain if for a while. Which of these do you think would do that best? Thank you!

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
5 months ago
Reply to  Laurel

Hi Laurel – I’m not sure how you plan on heating your item nor what it is – but if you are thinking about microwave heating, remember that many of the options above have some metallic content so they are right for the microwave. The “Wrap-n-Zap” is the only one that is actually designed for microwave heating. It’s what we used for our Tortilla Warmer – if you are thinking about something like a blanket that you could warm in the dryer, you’re options are broader, although the thermal fabrics and interfacings would probably be better because they aren’t are… Read more »

ANASTASIA SMALL
ANASTASIA SMALL
5 months ago

I am wanting to sew a denim apron with a heat reflective material on the back side to keep a chef cooler and safer. Any advice on what to use? Thanks!

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
5 months ago

Hi Anastasia – We haven’t really experimented with any of these in terms of keeping a person cool. The only suggestion I could mention is that the thermal fabrics are likely the only ones that would have any comfort level as a lining for your denim apron. They would world help with protection, but I’m not sure what level of “cooling” property they would have.

Theresa O'Brien
Theresa O'Brien
5 months ago

I want to make a curtain out of quilted reflective thermal material for my RV 150″ W x 84″L. Any suggestions on what material I could use that isn’t so expensive?

Kris
Kris
6 months ago

Hi Liz,
I am looking for a Quilted high heat (Approx 500degrees) resistance waterproof or water resistant (Even something that can be just wiped down) fabric. Looking for possibility to have different colors or patterns. Also, that is sewable.
Thank you,
Kris

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
6 months ago
Reply to  Kris

Hi Kris, That is quite a tall order of specifications. I’m afraid I cannot think of anything that meets of of them. You probably need to search/reach out to specialty fabric manufacturers who deal in the commercial production fields.

Kris
Kris
6 months ago
Reply to  Liz Johnson

Thank you!

N.U
N.U
7 months ago

Hello, I was wondering if you could help me with an enquiry. I would like to know if the thermal fabrics have a sort of grading, of how many hours it can retain heat for. I am asking with regards to food, specifically flat bread etc. I understand that tortilla warmers offer around an hour or so of heat retention, but I am looking for how to layer the best fabrics, so that the flat breads are hot, but not soggy or wet. I usually just use a tea towel, which I place the freshly made flatbed, and roll it… Read more »

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
7 months ago
Reply to  N.U

Hi N.U – I’m afraid I don’t know if there is any accurate chart for that kind of thing. The problem is there can be so many variables: the number of layers of thermal fabrics, the type and thickness of the outer fabric, whether simply keeping warm or heating in a microwave. Our go-to for warmers made with quilting cotton is traditionally a single layer of cotton batting (for microwave uses) or a single layer of InsulBright for things like hot pads. Below is a link to our Tortilla/Flat Bread warmer, which might also contain some ideas for you:
https://sew4home.com/fast-fridays-tortilla-or-flatbread-warmer/

Janet Clark
Janet Clark
8 months ago

Hi, we have a classic campervan and I would like to make some insulated window screens for winter use. Are any of your products suitable for the job? Thank you.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
8 months ago
Reply to  Janet Clark

Hi Janet – We get this question quite often 🙂 The products outlined above aren’t really meant for big jobs like curtains. However, The Warm Company, the manufacturer of several of these options, does have a window solution that we recommend.
Here’s a link to their site: https://warmcompany.com/?portfolio=warm-window%e2%93%87

Robbe Vancraeynest
Robbe Vancraeynest
11 months ago

Hi,
my name is Robbe and i’m a design student in Belgium. I am currently in the progress of designing a foldable sweatlodge. Before I can realize that I need the right fabric to keep the heat of the hot stones inside the sweatlodge and the cold from outside.
Could je help me with making the right choice?
I think one of the fabrics above will do the right job.

Greetings,
Robbe Vancraeynest

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
11 months ago

Hi Robbe – That sounds like quite an ambitious project! Unfortunately, your request is a very project-specific one with a lot of variables; we really don’t have any experience working with the extreme temperatures you’re describing. Our experience is with more traditional home projects, like hot pads or bottle sleeves. So sorry, but we simply do not have the expertise to be of help to you.

Paul Jackson
Paul Jackson
10 months ago

Hi Robbe,
A standard hardware store tarp will work for this. You can see temporary sweat lodges constructed on Seasons 2 and 3 of the American show “Alone”. Best of luck!

S A GOULD
S A GOULD
1 year ago

Ever since getting a memory foam bed, I feel like I am being cooked alive. (Like the adjustable bed.) Haven’t been able to find anything to block the heat it retains from my body. After about an hour and I half I wake up and find I am sweating. Have tried canvas, a reflective heat blanket, cotton, bamboo coverings, even a mattress protector made with Outlast® (like NASA uses), none make much difference at all. Had a Tulo mattress, which was hot, but after about an hour on it, any slight adjustment movement would also aggravate back problems, too. To… Read more »

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  S A GOULD

Hi there – My goodness; it does sound like you’ve tried everything. I wish I had a solution/idea for you, but I’m sorry to say this issue is out of our area of expertise.

Janice Sauter
Janice Sauter
1 year ago

I have a large amount of 3M Thinsulate and am wondering if this batting could be used for making pot holders.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Janice Sauter

Hi Janice – We haven’t worked with the Thinsulate for a hot pad before so can’t give you a 100% guarantee one way or the other. It certainly would help insulate, but it doesn’t have the reflective metallic layer of the others, so wouldn’t be our first choice for a hot pad. However, if you used more than one layer – maybe 2-3 – and adjusted any binding of the pad accordingly, it would likely be okay for standard use … ie. maybe not pizza right out of a 500˚ oven :-), but otherwise, likely to provide adequate protection.

Cathy Featherstone
Cathy Featherstone
1 year ago

I know that you probably don’t have experience in this area…but I would so appreciate your counsel! I am interested in making a food safe liner for the back wall of our RV pantry to help reduce the heat in that cabinet…which of these products would you suggest?!? Thank You!! Thank You for any counsel that you can provide! Grace & Peace!

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago

Hi Cathy – Yeah… that isn’t really anything we’ve had experience with. In general, I would think if you sandwich the thermal material between layers of 100% cotton, you should end up with a “food safe” liner. I’m unaware of any fumes that these materials give off, but I guess that wouldn’t be out of the question. That would probably be a question to send directly to the manufacturer of the product. But is layering is an option, any of the products below could help give you a bit of a thermal barrier. You might also want to check the… Read more »

Brenda Weidman
Brenda Weidman
1 year ago

I’m trying to find to use on the back of my curtains to keep the cold out in the winter the heat out in the summer which one would you suggest?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Brenda Weidman

Hi Brenda – These products aren’t really meant for big jobs like curtains. However, The Warm Company, the manufacturer of several of these options does have a window solution that we recommend. Here’s a link to their site: https://warmcompany.com/?portfolio=warm-window%e2%93%87

Jake Skillman
Jake Skillman
1 year ago

I tried to read all the comments to see of it was covered but couldn’t find my answer. Do you know which product when I use for a lunch tote? I like this design I saw on YouTube, but it only says “thermal fabric”. https://youtu.be/xM7dFMwNTAI
I’ m new to sewing. I’m a 1 1/2 months old sewer. 🙂 You’re info is awesome!

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Jake Skillman

@Jake – We’ve done a number of lunch totes and have used the Insul-Bright with success. Have fun – we hope you’ll come back for more info and projects.

TulaRue
TulaRue
1 year ago

I want to wrap the exhaust hose for a portable ac. The hose gets warm and counteracts the cool air from the ac. I have cats in the room so need something they won’t be enticed to scratch on.

Which product would you advise me to purchase?

Thanks.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  TulaRue

@TulaRue – That’s a very specific use for which we don’t really have any experience. We’re always reluctant to weigh in on situations with appliances involved – we wouldn’t want to suggest anything that could damage your AC unit or possibly cause a fire. That said, the Insul-Shine above is designed for duct work and so could possibly work in this situation, but it is not necessarily kitty scratch proof. You might have better luck reaching out to a home improvement expert for a more knowledgable answer.

Lynn Wood
Lynn Wood
2 months ago
Reply to  TulaRue

https://warmcompany.com/product/insul-shine-22-x-30-yard-bolt/
The company’s website states that insul shine is suited for AC ducts! Just what I’m looking for too.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
2 months ago
Reply to  Lynn Wood

Thanks for confirming your research.

Christine
Christine
1 year ago

I work with a wheelchair bound person who loves to go outside. He has difficulty regulating his body temperature, and he usually uses blankets to bundle up. I think we could improve the insulation properties by using better materials than the fleece he currently uses. I’m thinking to make a blanket, I would likely use Thinsulate for the “batting.” Would you agree, or would you recommend one of the other materials in your article? Do you have any suggestions for a windproof exterior fabric? I’d like to make him an upgraded blanket for his birthday this year.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Christine

@Christine – We would agree that the Thinsulate would be a good option for a blanket. Some of the more traditional thermal battings can be kind of “crinkly” – probably not the sound you want with a blanket. Regarding wind, the tighter the weave the better. I don’t think ripstop nylon (like what you’d find on a windbreaker) would be comfortable in a blanket. A quality fleece — perhaps a double-side fleece would be a good option, and traditional wool is always a good option – if backed with fleece, it shouldn’t be scratchy.

Jennifer Van Den Hoogen
Jennifer Van Den Hoogen
1 year ago

The insulation in my shopping cart was torn apart by an overzealous cashier. I was wonder sort of thermal fabric would work as a replacement for the insulation. Ideally it would be less flimsy

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago

@ Jennifer – I’m not 100% sure what you mean by your “shopping cart” – do you mean one of those personal rolling carts? If so, unless the thermal batting is covered in a layer of fabric, it is likely to always be a bit prone to tearing from “overzealous use.” So, I think I’d recommend either making a sandwich with a standard thermal batting (like an Insul-Bright) – cotton/batting/cotton similar to what you might do for a hot pad. Or, if you don’t want to go to that much work, look into one of the thermal fabrics, which are… Read more »

Mary daugherty
Mary daugherty
1 year ago

Would Insul-Bright used in facial masks be at all effective during the corona virus pandemic?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Mary daugherty

@Mary – We haven’t seen any information regarding the filtration level for thermal batting. As a batting it is not particularly “breathable” but we have sent a message to the manufacturer to see if they have any input. If we hear back, we will post about it within our main article on DIY Face Mask Patterns + Resources: https://sew4home.com/diy-face-mask-patterns-resources/

Tammi johnson
Tammi johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Liz Johnson

I made a couple mask last night put the thermal towards the front with cotton towards the back. Flannel on back side with cotton on front. Is very breathable and lightweight.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Tammi johnson

@Tammi – Thank you. We never did hear back from the manufacturer. I’m going to copy your comment onto our Face Mask Resource article. Thanks for your test!

Julie Moore
Julie Moore
1 year ago

Hi. I am looking for very lightweight thermal fabric to make a sleeping bag liner. I was looking at Solarize, but I can’t find any info on the R value or the weight of the fabric. I would need to make a sack approx. 60″x30″,weigh under a couple pounds and be very compact for backpacking. If anyone has a suggestion it would be very appreciated!

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Julie Moore

@Julie – this use isn’t our specialty so I can’t give you a 100% response, but I can recommend a local company we often turn to that specializes in outdoor fabric and hardware: The Rain Shed. The do carry thermal fleece and knits, and I’m sure would to happy to chap about the best options for your challenge. https://www.therainshed.com/

susanjodt
susanjodt
1 year ago

I’m trying to find an

I’m trying to find an insulation to make a cat bed that will warm-up when the cat is sitting or sleeping on the bed.  Do you have any suggestions?

Sue.B.Sews
Sue.B.Sews
1 year ago
Reply to  susanjodt

I’m doing the same thing,

I’m doing the same thing, wanting to make self-warming cat beds. I’ve purchased them from Chewy. I want to start sewing them to donate. 

Solorize might be the answer because it is washable and dryable. I may research it more. 

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