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Your project instructions call for two yards of 60″ wide fabric, but the fabric you want to use is 45″ wide. Hmmm… attempting to dredge up that old math lesson in proportions is probably not going to happen on the fly. Instead, print out our handy conversion chart for those times you don’t have a pattern envelope with a yardage conversion table.

Remember, these are general estimates. If your fabric has a big motif, a large repeat or is directional, it’s best to buy extra. When working with large repeats, the rule of thumb is to buy the pattern’s suggested amount of fabric plus enough extra to cover one full repeat.

Other extra-fabric situations include if you are cutting fabric on the bias or if your pattern includes extensive fussy cutting for matching pockets and the like.

When in doubt, add an extra ½ yard. It’s always better to have a bit more than not enough. Popular fabrics can sell-out in the blink of an eye. It’s best to get a bit more than you need when it’s readily available.

For a mini version, check out our Cheat Card Series.

Click the link for our: Sew4Home Fabric Yardage Conversion Chart in Adobe Acrobat format (36KB)

Sew4Home Fabric Yardage Conversion Chart in Adobe Acrobat format (36KB)

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82 Comments
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Melinda
Melinda
7 months ago

i am getting a jelly roll that has 40 strips that are 2.5″ wide by 44″ long. Will this be enough to make a twin size or a bit larger quilt? just for the top. I will do a big back piece after.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
7 months ago
Reply to  Melinda

Hi Melinda – we always suggest folks draw out their plan on graph paper to get an overall look prior to starting. You can then decide if the finished size/look is best for you. If you simply stitch together all 40 strips, using the minimum 1/4″ seam, this will give you a panel that is 79.5″ x 44″ with raw edges all around. You loose 1/4″ from each side of each strip sewn, but the very first strip and the very last strip each have one raw edge, which accounts for the 79.5″ rather than 80″. The standard size range… Read more »

Angelia
Angelia
9 months ago

Hello everyone. So do you break both the width and the length down? So the measurements for the fabric are 54″x36″. I am making a long floor robe and matching gown. 36″ is only 3 feet correct? So I need to order 3 yards, or 4 making sure its as long as I want it?

Last edited 9 months ago by Angelia
Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
9 months ago
Reply to  Angelia

Hi Angelia — the width is a constant based on your fabric — you can’t change that dimension.You can have fabric that is 36″ in width, or 45″, or 54” or 60”… etc. What is variable is the length – how much yardage you choose. Yes, 36″ is three feet or one yard. So if you need 36″ in width you are set. If you need 54” in length, divide that by 36”(one yard). That is 1.5 yards – exactly. We always recommend getting a bit more than the minimum.

Angelia
Angelia
9 months ago
Reply to  Liz Johnson

Thank you so much Ms. Liz.

Rodie
Rodie
10 months ago

If fabric is 54″ wide and 356″ long, how many yards do I need. Only using fabric to hang on a wall.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
10 months ago
Reply to  Rodie

Hi Rodie – I can’t tell you for sure as you’d need to map it out on the wall you want to cover. The 54″ width will let you know how many panels you need across the wall — don’t forget to account for some overlap panel-to-panel. The length will equal the height of your wall — again with some extra at the top and the bottom for a hem or something to finish the raw edge. For example, if your wall is 8′ tall, that is 96″ which translates to 2.66 yards (96 divided by 36″ in a yard).… Read more »

Connie
Connie
1 year ago

Hi! Newbie here! I’m trying to make a pad for a bench. Bench measures 18” wide and 60” long. How much fabric do I need?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Connie

Hi Connie – I wish there was one, flat answer, but there are a lot of variable that make it impossible to say exactly what you’ll need. If there is a direction to your fabric’s print, that will determine if you need to cut your panels horizontally or vertically. Once you have your chosen fabric, you need to determine its width (45, 54, 60″?). In your case, if you want a 60″ finished length, for one continuous cut, you’d need fabric around 64″ wide, because you need to account for your seam allowance to stitch front to back, and… you… Read more »

Cindy
Cindy
1 year ago

Hi I need help. How many yards of material would I need from 65 inches width x 94 h

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Cindy

Hi Cindy – 94″ is just 1/2″ shy of 2-5/8 yards – a full 2-5/8 would be 94.5″. Each yard (36″) in depth would be 65″ in width as that’s how it’s measured. The width of the fabric off the bolt can vary based on what type of fabric it is. Something as wide as you mention is probably a home decor fabric or maybe a fleece. The depth is what makes up the yardage so all you need to do is divide the depth by 36″.

Linda
Linda
1 year ago

Hi there. Do you have a fabric conversion chart that begins with 25”? I’m only finding conversion charts from 32” to 60 “.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Linda

Hi Linda, we don’t have such a chart since there aren’t a lot of fabrics with in the super narrow widths. Sometimes what we do when trying to use scrap fabric is to draw out the dimensions we have to work with on graph paper and then sketch in the pieces to cut. Start with your width set at 25″ and the keep extending the length until you have enough yardage to accommodate everything.

Denise Levenson
Denise Levenson
1 year ago

Vertical Repeat: 29 1/8″ what does this mean

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago

Hi Denise – it means the main design within your fabric takes a full 29-1/8″ (in height – vertically on the fabric) before it repeats itself. You can read more about motif and repeat here: https://sew4home.com/top-10-sew4home-designer-tips-for-blending-colors-and-prints/

Kathye
Kathye
1 year ago

Hello I need help! I need to convert 64″ wide by 59″ l to how many yards of material would I need and what width would I use?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Kathye

Hi Kathye – we can’t really give you specific recommendations long distance. There are SO many variables! I’m not quite sure which way you’re hoping to convert based on your comment – it sounds like maybe you need to go down from 64″ to 59″. A good option is to sketch it out on paper. Start with the size of the cut you want/need. Draw the width along your horizontal axis. You can then tell if your fabric width will be sufficient. For example, if you need a 64″ width but your fabric is only 59″, you’ll need more than… Read more »

Alicia
Alicia
1 year ago

Hello! Thanks for the chart! I just want to make sure I’m understanding it correctly. The fabric width is 60”. I’m needing 2.25 yards of 44” fabric. According to the chart, I would need 1.25 yards? Just making sure I’m reading it correctly! I always buy a tad bit more than needed.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Alicia

Hi there — if your pattern states 2.25 yards of 44″ fabric, you would find that box within the chart and go straight across to the 60″ box, if that is the width of the fabric you wish to buy – that box says 1.75 yards at 60″.

Brandi
Brandi
1 year ago

I have 2 dumb questions, but learning, what does 58″ x 1.5 yd mean? The other question is, what does anti-pill mean referring to fabric?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Brandi

Hi Brandi — There are no dumb questions 🙂 We wouldn’t necessarily specify fabric in this way, but I’m pretty sure they want you to use fabric that is at least 58″ in width. You would then buy one and a half yards. I don’t know the pattern you are using, but if they said 58″, that probably means AT LEAST, so you could work with wide fabrics (say 60″) and then trim your final piece to 58″. Anti-pill usually refers to fleece or knit fabrics. It means the fabric is unlikely to form those annoying tiny fabric balls on… Read more »

Karen
Karen
1 year ago

I have a piece of furniture that is 40x40x40. If the material is 42-43 in how much material will I need

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Karen

Hi Karen, I’m afraid there are too many variables for us to give you a good recommendation long distance, ie. what you are making/covering, lightweight versus heavyweight fabric, the need for fussy cutting/pattern matching, etc. I’d suggest doing what we often do when starting a project: draw it out on some graph paper. Remember to account for any seam allowances and/or hems. If you need to join panels to get something wide enough, we do have a good tutorial about that:
https://sew4home.com/donna-babylon-quick-tip-joining-fabric-widths-to-make-an-extra-wide-panel/

Karen
Karen
1 year ago
Reply to  Liz Johnson

Thank you

Dawne
Dawne
1 year ago

I need 33 X 44 pieces from a 65 X 80 bolt
Trying to get the most out of the bolt
Making guinea pig cage liners

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Dawne

Hello Dawne – We don’t really have time to map out an exact recommendation for you; your best option is draw it out on a piece of graph paper. However, if you could make the rectangles just a bit smaller – you could fit two side by side across the 65″ width.

Pam Palmer
Pam Palmer
1 year ago

I need 6.5 meters of 140 cm wide fabric but can only get 112 cm wide fabric. How many meters of 112 cm wide fabric would I need please?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Pam Palmer

Hi there, Pam. The chart above is a general “rule-of-thumb” standard for yardage conversion. Going with these generic percentages, you will likely need at least another yard. However, don’t run to the cutting counter on just my suggestion. You can try what we often do when figuring yardage as it takes into account the size and shape of individual pieces you may be cutting as well as the scale and repeat of your fabric’s motif should you want to fussy cut and/or pattern match: draw out a rectangle on paper, using your 112cm width as the horizontal axis and the… Read more »

Amber
Amber
1 year ago

I have Simplicity 9761 that calls for 17 3/7 yd at 45″ wide. How much would you estimate I need if I can get fabric in 60″ or 110″ wide?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
1 year ago
Reply to  Amber

Hi Amber – I can’t figure that out long distance for you as there are a number of variables. I did a quick search on the pattern and see that it is a Civil War era costume, which means there are likely quite a few pattern pieces. You can see in our simple chart above that the amount of yardage needed doesn’t decrease by a huge amount as you increase width. You could figure an estimate with these averages – or what might be better – and more accurate – would be to draw it out on paper, taking a… Read more »

Elizabeth
Elizabeth
2 years ago

I am covering a boat hatch that is 24” x 24”. It will be gathered tightly around the outsides. How much fabric to I need to cut?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
2 years ago
Reply to  Elizabeth

Hi Elizabeth – As mentioned below – we really can’t do custom planning long distance as there are too many variables involved. Try drawing it out on paper. Figure out how much of a “drop” you want from the surface of the hatch – the longer the drop, the more “grip” around the base you’re likely to get. To this measurement, add enough for a hem and a casing. Add this total to all four sides.

DSmith
DSmith
2 years ago

I have a awning 218”x96”. My fabric is 48” wide how many yards will I need?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
2 years ago
Reply to  DSmith

Hi there — we really can’t do custom planning long distance as there are too many variables in terms of the type of fabric, if there is a directional motif involved, the construction of the awning (hems, drops, overhang) etc. Your best bet it to draw it out on paper to determine the best option. A couple things to keep in mind: 48″ x 2 does = 96″ (your finished measurement) but that doesn’t allow for any hemming or seam allowances, which means that you will likely need to seam together three panels. You could add a solid color or… Read more »

Ariel
Ariel
2 years ago

I need fabric to cover 26 ft long by 9 ft wide how many yards thst is.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
2 years ago
Reply to  Ariel

Hello – we cannot do this long distance for you – there are too many variables. Your best option is to draw it out on a piece of paper and then compare what you need to the width of the fabric you want to purchase. Remember, there are three feet (36″) in a yard. And, if you haven’t already, you’ll need to account for any seam allowances and hems.

Sue gray
Sue gray
2 years ago

I am making crib sheets. My mattress is 28 1/2 in. Wide. The material I am looking at is 42 in. Wide. I add 12 to the 28 1/2 and get 40 1/2 to make the sheet. Will this be big
enough in width when I add the elastic.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
2 years ago
Reply to  Sue gray

Hi Sue – it would be best to go with the measurements given in the pattern you are using as the depth of the mattress also figures in. Four our Cozy Crib Sheet, which is based on a standard 52″ x 28″ x 6″ deep crib mattress, the starting cut is 45″ wide x 69″ long. You might be able to squeak by with 42″ – but again, without knowing the pattern you are working with, I can’t really give you a for-sure answer.

Marian Rector
Marian Rector
2 years ago

I’ve got a quilt top (60×60 inches) that I need a backing for. The fabric I want to use is 44 inches wide. I think I will have a seem down the middle of the backing. How many yards of fabric do I need?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
2 years ago
Reply to  Marian Rector

Hi Marian — the best idea is to draw it out, but in general – yep, you’ll need to seam together two strips since your WOF is just 44″. Depending on the fabric’s motif, it’s probably best to trim each panel to about 32″ and then seam. Depending on your seam allowance, this will give you about 63″ of width – it’s always best to have your back be slightly wider than the top so you can lay down the top and trim the backing flush. Since your quilt is 60″ in length and you are working with 2 strips,… Read more »

Judy
Judy
2 years ago

Hi, I’m thinking of adding silk fabric panels to my room divider – 6 panels with these dimensions: 61” long with a little extra to sew in a dowel so that it hangs taut and 12-3/8” wide. How much is that on yardage? Thanks so much for your advice.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
2 years ago
Reply to  Judy

Hi Judy – there are really too many variables in terms of type of fabric, fabric width, final construction/hemming, etc for me to give you a guaranteed recommendation long distance. My best suggestion is to draw it out on a piece of paper. Use the horizontal axis to represent the width of the silk you are planning to use (44″, 54″, etc.), then draw in each of the panels you are hoping to create (adding in extra for hemming, dowel pocket, seam allowances, etc), first going across to see how many panels you can get in one row, then moving… Read more »

Esther Joyner
Esther Joyner
2 years ago

I have a question my window is 66 and 1/4 wide by 80 my fabric only 54 in wide what can I do

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
2 years ago
Reply to  Esther Joyner

Hi Esther – We have a tutorial on joining panels that might be just what you’re looking for: https://sew4home.com/donna-babylon-quick-tip-joining-fabric-widths-to-make-an-extra-wide-panel/

Jennifer Gustafson
Jennifer Gustafson
2 years ago

I have a classroom desk that I want to cover. The dimensions are 115” x 30” how many yards will I need?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
2 years ago

Hi Jennifer – I can’t give you an exact answer as it will depend on the width of fabric you are thinking about using as well as how you plan to use it on the desk: like a tablecloth, gathered all around – that type of thing. Your best option is to draw it out on a piece of paper. Think about the two axis lines as your fabric – so one axis is the width of the fabric (say you use an upholstery fabric that is 54″ wide) and then the other axis becomes the length (the yardage) required.… Read more »

Paige
Paige
2 years ago

Hey I’m making a baby blanket and the project calls for the front piece a 30in square and the back piece 40”. How much fabric do I need to buy?

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
2 years ago
Reply to  Paige

Oh my – so sorry, this question didn’t come through into our regular inbox. It will depend on the width of fabric your are buying, but going for a minimum width of 44″ – if it’s the same fabric, you would need two yards – if two different fabrics: one yard for the front, and 1-1/8 yards to 1-1/4 yards (depending on your cutting accuracy) for the back. If you draw it out on a piece of paper that often helps – use your fabric width as one axis and then the other axis will give you the yardage.

Sammy
Sammy
3 years ago

Hello,
I am a male and just bought an old Lane foot stool bench for my lady to sit on to change her clothes. I removed all the staples from the plywood holding the old worn fabric and want to purchase new fabric of her choice. The dimensions are 46″ x 16 ” –I also need to purchase new foam backing say 1-2″ thick.
How much fabric in yards will I need counting the excess that needs to be stapled onto the plywood backing and including the foam?
Thank You ladies !
Sammy
usnavyveteran51@aol.com

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
3 years ago
Reply to  Sammy

Hi Sammy – What a lovely gift. Unfortunately, there are too many variables for us to be much help given you exact advice long distance: fabric width based on the type of fabric, pattern direction for matching, the final construction method to determine the wrap, etc. The very best option, one that we often use, is to make a pattern from the old fabric you removed. If that fabric is already gone, next best is to make a pattern from large sheets of paper, like kraft or wrapping paper. If possible, purchase the foam first so you make sure you… Read more »

Teya Bridgmon
Teya Bridgmon
3 years ago

Hey I have 60″ wide fabric but my pattern uses 45″ wide. Do i just fold it in half then it’s only 30″? Do I adjust my fabric to make it 45″ so the fold want be equal? To scared to cut until I’m sure.

Liz Johnson
Admin
Liz Johnson
3 years ago
Reply to  Teya Bridgmon

Hi Teya – I don’t know what you’re making so it’s hard to give advice long distance. And, I don’t know if your fabric is directional, has a large motif, etc…. kind of a lot of variables. In general, I wouldn’t cut your fabric down to 45″ – instead just deal with each pattern piece or cut individually to make the best use of any motif (to get the best “fussy cut”) and to get the most efficient use of the fabric.

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