Dritz_2016_Leaderboard_Visit Dritz
Janome General-Leaderboard right

Facebook Twitter Sew4Home RSS Feed Follow Me on Pinterest Instagram

Sew4Home

WordPlay Messenger Bag: Dritz Hardware & Notions

Printer-friendly versionSend by emailPDF version

Got something to say? This bag lets you make a statement in style. It’s a messenger bag with a real message! We used iron-on letters by Dritz® to create the FACT - FICTION phrase on our WordPlay Bag. Read on to see five other word pairings we thought were fun or brainstorm to come up with your own. Three muted colors of canvas work together with classic Dritz® metal D-Rings, a swivel clip, and metal button studs to give our bag a hardworking, good looking feel… and that’s a FACT! 

Our thanks to Dritz® for providing all the key hardware components as well as the cool iron-on letters. Placing these elements against a solid, tricolor background allows the accents to shine without competition from the fabric. 

We really loved the look of the 3” Distressed Iron-On Letters by Dritz®. They have a chalk or spray paint look reminiscent of graffiti, which was perfect for our urban style. Each package contains 31 letters. There is one of every letter of the alphabet plus one extra of the letters: A, E, I, O and S. We mixed white and black to allow certain letters to stand out. You might notice on FICTION, our highlight letters spell: CON. 

A few helpful hints for working with these and other iron-on letters. If you’re having trouble with the letters adhering, it may be your iron setting (too cool or not being allowed to pre-heat completely) or the ironing surface. It isn’t recommended to apply these letters on heat-reflective ironing board covers. They push the heat back up and cause the glue to melt. A heavy cotton ironing board cover pulls the heat down, which in turn pulls the adhesive down into the fibers of the fabric to which you’re applying the letters. Check out the Dritz® lettering video on YouTube for more information. 

Below are some of the other word pairings we played with for our sample bag. In general, short words are best and it’s fun if the two words go together to make a phrase. You could also use a person’s name, initials, a city and state, or a series of numbers. It could even be a coded message known only to you and your inner circle. 

Dritz® fasteners always add both form and function to a bag project. Jean Button studs on the front flap pockets are good looking and tough enough to stand up to heavy use. The D-Rings and Swivel Clip make the shoulder strap adjustable and let the front wrap-over strap cinch the main flap securely closed. 

Load up this bag with whatever your daily adventures call for. The heavy-duty canvas exterior is stabilized with fusible foam so it holds its shape but still retains a comfy softness that provides protection for what’s inside and allows the bag to sit comfortably against your body. 

We usually suggest pre-washing your fabric prior to construction, but in this case we also recommend it in order to give the stiff-off-the-bolt canvas a softer feel. Once finished, as with most commercial bags you’d purchase, this bag will hold its shape better and last longer with simple spot cleaning. The majority of bags are not really meant to go through the torture of machine washing and drying.

The webbing we chose is the polypropylene type used for hiking and tie-downs. We recommend this over a cotton webbing because not only is it stronger, the ends can be heat sealed, eliminating the need for any hemming. We found ours at a local outdoor store.

Dritz® always has lot of fun new ideas and products to make your sewing easier and more creative. To find out more, we invite you to visit their website or blog; or follow them on Pinterest, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube

You can find Dritz® notions and hardware at fine in-store and online retailers everywhere

Our bag finishes at approximately 11" high x 17" wide with a 4" base and sides and a fully adjustable strap.

Sewing Tools You Need

Fabric and Other Supplies

  • WordPlay Pattern Pieces; download using the link below in the Getting Started section
  • TWO Dritz® Jean Buttons; we used nickel
  • FOUR Dritz® 1½” D-Rings; we used nickel
  • ONE Dritz® 1” D-Ring; we used nickel
  • ONE Dritz® ⅞” Swivel Hook; we used nickel
  • TWO packages of Dritz® Iron-On Letters; we used 3” Distressed Soft-Flex Letters in both White and Black
  • ⅔ yard of 50"+ wide mid-weight canvas or denim in a solid color for the main exterior front and back panels; we used 9.3 oz duck canvas cloth in moss
  • ½ yard of 50"+ wide mid-weight canvas or denim in a coordinating solid color for the flap and the top sections of the side wall; we used 9.3 oz duck canvas cloth in natural
  • ⅓ yard of 50"+ wide mid-weight canvas or denim in a coordinating solid color for the bottom section of the side wall and the pocket flaps; we used 9.3 oz duck canvas cloth in nutmeg
  • 1 yard of 44"+ wide standard weight cotton in a coordinating print for the lining of the bag and the pocket flap lining; we used Geo Dragonfly in Slate from the Me + You Indah Batiks collection by Hoffman
  • 2 yards of 1½” webbing for the shoulder straps; we used polypropylene hiking webbing in olive, purchased locally at an outdoor store
  • ½ yard of 1” webbing for the front wrapping strap; we used polypropylene hiking webbing in olive, purchased locally at an outdoor store
  • 1 yard of 20"+ fusible foam; we used Pellon One-Sided Fusible Flex Foam
  • ½ yard of 45"+ mid-weight fusible interfacing; we used Pellon Décor Bond
  • All-purpose thread to match fabric and webbing
  • One all-purpose thread to slightly contrast for topstitching; we chose a tan just slightly darker than the natural canvas
  • See-through ruler
  • Fabric pen or pencil
  • Seam gauge
  • Seam ripper
  • Scissors or rotary cutter and mat
  • Iron and ironing board
  • Straight pins 
  • Roll of tissue paper for lettering templates
  • Small hammer to secure Jean Buttons
  • Small lighter or matches to heat-seal the ends of the webbing

Getting Started

  1. Download and print the 13 pages that make up the various WordPlay Messenger Bag Pattern pieces. These pages have been bundled into one PDF file to make the download easier.
    IMPORTANT: Each page of the pattern is ONE 8½" x 11" sheet. You must print the PDF file at 100%. DO NOT SCALE to fit the page. There is a guide rule on each page to confirm your print out is to scale. 
  2. The small pocket flap is one page. 
  3. The front exterior base pocket is made up of two pieces (A & B). Cut out the pieces along the solid line, then use the printed arrows to butt together the two pieces into the final full pattern. Do not overlap. Tape in place. 
  4. The main exterior back panel is made up of four pieces (C, D, E & F). Cut out the pieces along the solid line, then use the printed arrows to butt together the four pieces into the final full pattern. Do not overlap. Tape in place.
  5. The main exterior front bottom panel is made up of three pieces (G, H & I). Cut out the pieces along the solid line, then use the printed arrows to butt together the three pieces into the final full pattern. Do not overlap. Tape in place.
  6. The main flap is made up of three pieces (J, K & L). Cut out the pieces along the solid line, then use the printed arrows to butt together the three pieces into the final full pattern. Do not overlap. Tape in place.
  7. From the canvas for the main exterior front and back panels (the Moss in our sample), cut the following: 
    Using the front exterior base pocket pattern, cut ONE
    Using the main exterior back panel pattern, cut ONE
    Using the main exterior front bottom pattern, cut ONE
    ONE 18” x 4¾” strip for the exterior front top panel
    ONE 3” x 2” strip for the bottom D-Ring loop 
  8. From the canvas for the flap and the top sections of the side wall (the Natural in our sample), cut the following:
    Using the main flap pattern, cut TWO
    TWO 5” x 10” strips for the top sections of the sidewall
  9. From the canvas for the bottom half of the side wall and the pocket flaps (the Nutmeg in our sample), cut the following:
    Using the small pocket flap pattern, cut TWO
    Transfer the dot marking from the pattern to the flap fabric. Do this by placing a pin through the dot on the paper.

    Then mark the point where the pin emerges on the fabric. This is the button position.

    ONE 5” x 23” strip for the bottom section of the sidewall
  10. From the fabric for the lining (the Indah Batik in our sample), cut the following:
    Using the main exterior back panel pattern, cut TWO
    ONE 11" wide x 13" high rectangle for the lining pocket
    ONE 5” x 40” strip for the sidewall
    Using the small pocket flap pattern, cut TWO
  11. From the mid-weight interfacing, cut the following:
    Using the small pocket flap pattern, but cutting along the inner stitching line rather than the solid line, cut TWO

    Using the main flap pattern, but cutting along the inner stitching line rather than the solid line, cut ONE
    ONE 10” x 6” rectangle for the lining pocket
    TWO 4” x 9” strips for the top sections of the sidewall
    ONE 4” x 22” strip for the bottom section of the sidewall
  12. From the fusible foam, use the main exterior back panel pattern to cut TWO, but cut along the inner stitching line rather than the solid line
  13. From the 1” webbing, cut ONE 13” length.
  14. From the 1½” webbing, cut the following:
    TWO 5” lengths for the side strap loops
    ONE 12” length for shoulder strap A
    ONE 44” length for shoulder strap B

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

Adding the letters

  1. When working with lettering, the two most important positioning things to remember are: 1) give yourself both an upper and lower guide line on which to align each letter, and 2) when nesting (called “kerning” in design) the letters, err on the side of what feels almost too close. Most people space lettering too far apart. Your word will look better if letters are more tightly nested. For example, in our work FACT, the C tucks under the T.
  2. Align the letters on your cutting mat first. When you have them kerned to your liking, tape them in place on the mat. Your words may vary, but as a reference, on our sample, the word FACT was 9½” wide and the work FICTION was 14¾” wide. You wouldn’t want to go any wider than 14¾” for the word along the back of the bag. You could go a bit wider with the front word, but it will look best in terms of balance if that word stops about midway across the front of the bag. 
  3. Place a piece of tissue paper over the taped-in-place letters.
  4. Trace the letters onto the tissue paper overlay.
  5. Find the 18” x 4¾” strip, which is the exterior front top panel on which the “inside word” will be placed (FACT in our sample).
  6. Draw in two guidelines for aligning the letters. Our letters are 3” so our guidelines were 3” apart. 
  7. We found it most accurate to fold the fabric panel in half to find the horizontal center line. Finger press to set a crease. Unfold so the panel is once again flat and right side up on your work surface. Measure 1½” above the center crease and draw the top guideline. Then measure 1½” below the center crease and draw the bottom guideline.
  8. Measure ¾” in from the left side of the fabric panel and draw a vertical line intersecting the two horizontal lines. This is the where the outer edge of the first letter of your word will be aligned. Tape the fabric panel onto the cutting mat.
  9. Find your tissue overlay. Place it over the fabric panel and align the traced letters with the fabric’s guidelines. When properly aligned both horizontally and vertically, tape the tissue overlay in place on the cutting mat.
  10. Collect the letters for your word. Slip the first letter under the tissue. Adjust the letter until it lines up perfectly with the traced letter. 
  11. Carefully lift up the tissue and tape the letter in place on the fabric panel. 
  12. Continue in the same manner to place and secure each letter.
  13. When all the letters are placed and secured, you can remove the tissue overlay.
  14. With a pre-heated iron, press each letter in place from the front.
  15. When all the letters have been pressed into place from the front, flip over the panel on the ironing board and press again from the back of the panel. 
  16. Flip over the panel once again to the right side, and carefully peel away the backing from each letter. 
  17. The word across the exterior back panel is placed and adhered in the same manner. 
  18. Your bottom guideline should be drawn in 1½” up from the bottom raw edge of the panel.
  19. The top guideline is 3” above and parallel with this bottom line. 
  20. This word (FICTION in our sample) should be centered across the back panel. Fold the panel in half to find the exact center and place a pin to mark this point. 
  21. Using your center point marking and the top and bottom guidelines, tape your letters in place. 
  22. Adhere as above and set aside both panels. 

Make the front pocket flaps

  1. Find the two exterior flaps, the two lining flaps, and the two pieces of pocket flap interfacing. 
  2. Center an interfacing piece on the wrong side of each exterior flap. There should be ½” of fabric showing beyond the interfacing all around. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place.
  3. Place the fused exterior flap and the lining flap right sides together. Pin in place along both sides and across the curved bottom. The straight top edge remains open. 
  4. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch along both sides and across the curved bottom. The straight top edge remains open.
  5. Clip for smooth curve.
  6. Turn the flap right side out through the open top. Use a blunt tool to round the corners. A chopstick, knitting needle or point turner works well. 
  7. Re-thread the machine with the contrasting thread for topstitching in the top and bobbin. 
    NOTE: For all our topstitching we used a stretch stitch, which moves back and forth to create a thicker stitch. In addition, we lengthened the stitch length to 3.5 and used our Janome Edge Guide foot
  8. Edgestitch along both sides and acorss the curved bottom. Once again, the straight top remains open and raw. 
  9. If your button placement mark has faded (or if you forgot to do it above), find the paper pattern and replace the mark.
  10. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the exterior pocket in the top and to match the lining in the bobbin. Re-set the stitch and stitch length to normal. 
  11. Following the instructions for your machine make and model, create a horizontal buttonhole centered over this mark. The buttonhole should be set to fit the Dritz® Jean Button.
  12. Repeat to create the matching second flap. 

Assemble the front panel with its three pockets

  1. Find the front exterior base pocket, the main exterior front bottom, the exterior front top panel with its word fused in place, and the two finished pocket flaps. 
  2. Along the top straight edge of the exterior base pocket, make a ½” double hem. To do this, Fold back the raw edge ¼” and press, then fold back an additional ¼” and press again. 
  3. Re-thread the machine with the contrasting topstitching thread in the top and bobbin. After making the buttonholes, you’ll need to re-set the stitch and stitch length. They should be re-set to match your original topstitching settings. 
  4. Stitch the hem in place close to the inner fold.
  5. Place the main exterior front bottom piece right side up and flat on your work surface. 
  6. Place the exterior base pocket right side up on top of the front panel. The raw side edges and the curved bottom edges of both panels should be flush. The top hemmed edge of the pocket will sit 1½” down from top raw edge of the front panel. Lightly pin together the layers. 
  7. Measure to find the exact center. Draw a vertical guideline through the exact center of the pocket. 
  8. With the machine still threaded and set for topstitching, stitch along the drawn vertical line through both layers. 
  9. Find the finished pocket flaps. Center a flap over each pocket, which means there should be about ½” between the flaps at the center. The top raw edge of each flap should be flush with the top raw edge of the main front bottom panel. Pin the flaps in place. 
  10. Find the exterior front top panel with its word fused in place. Place the panel right sides together along the top of the main bottom front panel, sandwiching the flaps between the layers. Double check that your panel is correctly postponed with the word to the left and that you are aligning the bottom of the word panel with the top of the main panel. Pin in place through all the layers.
  11. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the fabric in the top and bobbin. Re-set the stitch and stitch length to normal. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch across the width of the panel through all the layers. 
  12. Press the top panel up into position. Press the seam allowance up towards the top panel. Press from the wrong side; don’t touch the letters with the iron.
  13. Re-thread and re-set the the machine for topstitching. Edgestitch along the horizontal seam within the top panel. 
  14. Open up the buttonholes.
  15. Place a pin through the center of the buttonhole to mark the position for the Dritz® Jean Button on the front of the pocket below. 
  16. Poke the bottom stud of the Jean Button through the pocket at this point, from back (from the inside of the pocket) to front. 
  17. Hammer the top into place on the stud and button the flap closed. Repeat to attach the button for the second flap. 

Fuse the foam and place the bottom D-ring

  1. Flip the assembled front panel wrong side up on your ironing surface. 
  2. Find the back exterior panel with its word in place. Flip it wrong side up on your ironing surface.
  3. Find the two foam panels. 
  4. Center a foam panel on the wrong side of each exterior panel. There should be ½” of fabric showing beyond the foam all around. 
  5. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place. 
  6. Find the 3” x 2” piece of canvas. Fold it in half, right sides together so it is now 1½” x 2”.
  7. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the fabric in the top and bobbin. Re-set the stitch and stitch length to normal.
  8. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch along the 2” side.
  9. Press open the seam allowance. Turn the tiny strip right side out through an open end and press flat with the seam along one side.
  10. Find the 1” D-Ring. Slip the tab through the D-Ring and align the raw edges of the tab.
  11. Find the front panel. Place it right side up on your work surface. Place the tab at the bottom, centered over the pocket dividing seam line. Pin the tab in place. The raw ends of the tab should be flush with the bottom raw edge of the panel. 
  12. Machine baste the tab in place.

Assemble the main flap

  1. Find the two main flap panels and the flap interfacing. 
  2. Center the interfacing on the wrong side of one flap panel. There should be ½” of fabric showing beyond the interfacing all around. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place.
  3. Find the center of the interfaced flap along its top straight edge. Mark this center point with a pin. 
  4. Find the 13” length of 1” webbing. Heat seal both ends of the webbing. To do this, simply pass each end of the webbing though a small flame until it melts just a bit. 
  5. Place one end of the webbing over the flap’s center pin point so the end of the webbing is flush with the raw edge of the fabric. Pin the webbing 4½” down from the top raw edge. 
  6. Thread the machine with thread to best match webbing in the top and bobbin. Lengthen the stitch. 
  7. Stitch the webbing in place. Start at the top raw edge. Edgestitch down one side, cross over at the 4½” mark, then edgestitch back up the other side.
  8. Place the remaining plain flap panel right sides together with this stitched and interfaced panel. Pin along both sides and across the curved bottom.
  9. The top remains open. Make sure you pull the loose end of the webbing towards the center so it is out of the way of the seam.
  10. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch along both sides and across the curved bottom. The straight top edge remains open.
  11. Clip for smooth curve.
  12. Turn the flap right side out through the open top. Use a blunt tool to round the corners. A chopstick, knitting needle or point turner works well. 
  13. Re-thread and re-set the machine for topstitching.
  14. Edgestitch along both sides and across the curved bottom. Once again, the straight top remains open and raw. 

Assemble the sidewall and add the side strap loops

  1. Find the three sections of the sidewall and the three pieces of sidewall interfacing. 
  2. Center an interfacing piece on the wrong side of each section. There should be ½” of fabric showing beyond the interfacing on all sides. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place. 
  3. Place a top section right sides together at either end of the center section. Pin in place.
  4. Re-thread the machine with thread to match the fabric and re-set the stitch and stitch length to normal. 
  5. Using a ½” seam allowance stitch each short seam to create the full sidewall. 
  6. Press the seam allowances toward the bottom panel. 
  7. Re-thread and re-set the machine for topstitching. Edgestitch along each seam within the bottom panel. 
  8. Find the two 5” lengths of 1½” webbing. Heat seal both ends on each piece. 
  9. Find two of the 1½” D-Rings.
  10. Loop one end of the webbing through the D-Ring, pulling it back on itself 1”. Pin the end in place.
  11. Repeat with the remaining length of webbing and the remaining D-Ring. 
  12. Position a strap loop within each top section of the sidewall (the natural canvas sections on our sample).
  13. The strap loop should be placed on the right side of the fabric and be centered side to side. 
  14. The top of the webbing loop (the bottom of the D-Ring) should be 1¼” from the top raw edge of the fabric. Pin in place.
  15. Thread the machine with thread to best match webbing in the top and bobbin. Lengthen the stitch. 
  16. Stitch the webbing in place with a large open box. Stitch across the bottom, pivot, stitch up one side, cross over right below the bottom of the D-Ring to catch the folded back portion, pivot, and stitch down the opposite side to finish. 

Stitch the sidewall to the exterior panels

  1. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the fabric in the top and bobbin and re-set the stitch and stitch length to normal.
    NOTE: For the photos below, we made a mini version of the bag in order to capture the whole process within the camera frame. 
  2. Fold the sidewall in half to find the exact center. Mark with a pin at both the top and bottom of the sidewall.
  3. Fold the front and back exterior panels in half to find the center point on each along the bottom curved edge. Mark each center point with a pin. 
  4. Place the side panel right sides together with the front exterior panel, first aligning the center point pins on both pieces. 
  5. Starting at this center point, pin along the bottom, ease to pin around the corner, then continue pinning up to the top corner of the bag. Repeat to pin from the center out and up to the opposite top corner of the bag.
  6. Attach the back exterior panel in the same manner to the remaining raw edge. If the sidewall extends beyond either of the base panels, trim away the excess from the sidewall so all layers are flush along the top. Before stitching, check to make sure the top sections are even with one another on both sides.
  7. Stitch both sides of the sidewall in place, using a ½” seam allowance. Go slowly to keep your seam even and straight – especially around the curved bottom corners.

Stitch the main flap in place

  1. With the exterior bag right side out, find the main flap. 
  2. Place the flap right sides together against the back of the bag, aligning the raw edges of all the layers. The flap should fit perfectly between the sidewall seams. Pin in place.
  3. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch across through all the layers. 
  4. Pull the flap up into position and press the seam allowance down towards the inside of the bag. 
  5. Press back the rest of the top edge of the bag ½” to match the seam allowance so there is now an even folded edge around the entire top of the bag. 
  6. Set aside. 

Create the lining

  1. Find the 11" x 13" lining pocket panel and the 10" x 6" interfacing panel. 
  2. Center the interfacing on one half of the pocket panel on the wrong side. Following manufacturer's instructions, fuse in place.
  3. Fold the pocket in half, wrong sides together, so it now measures 11" x 6½”.
  4. Pin in place along both sides and across the bottom. Leave an approximate 3" opening along the bottom for turning.
  5. Using a ½" seam allowance, stitch along both sides and across the bottom, pivoting at the corners. Lock your seam on either side of the 3" opening. 
  6. Clip the corners and press open the seam allowance.
  7. Turn the pocket right side out through the opening. Gently poke out the corners so they are nice and sharp. Press flat, pressing in the raw edges of the opening so they are flush with the sewn seam. 
  8. Find one of the two main lining panels. 
  9. Place the pocket on the right side of the panel. The pocket should be positioned 2½" down from the upper raw edge of the panel and centered side to side. 
  10. Edgestitch the pocket in place along both sides and across the bottom, pivoting at the corners. This closes the opening in the seam. For the cleanest finish, use a lock stitch to start and end your seam or leave your thread tails long and hand knot at the back to secure. 
  11. Following the same steps as above for the exterior, pin the lining sidewall to the front and back lining panels.
  12. First line up the center points. 
  13. Then pin up the sides, easing around the corners.
  14. Stitch both seams as above, using a ½" seam allowance.
  15. Trim away any excess sidewall fabric so the top raw edge is even all around.
  16. Press back the top edge of the lining ½" all around.

Final assembly

  1. Find the exterior bag. It should be right side out.
  2. Find the lining bag. It should be wrong side out.
  3. Slip the lining bag inside the exterior bag so the two bags are now wrong sides together. Align the side seams and the bottom curved corners. The pocket should sit against the back of the bag.
  4. The top folded edges of the exterior and the lining should be flush all around. If they are not, adjust the fold of the lining to create a perfect match. 
  5. Pin the lining to the exterior all around the top. 
  6. Re-thread and re-set the machine for topstitching. Edgestitch all around the top of the bag.
  7. To determine the final length for the front webbing strap, slip a small pillow or some rolled batting into the bag to simulate how the bag will be when it’s full o’ stuff. Don’t over-fill; you just want enough in there so when you bring the flap over, the top isn't smashed together too much, making the webbing length artificially short. In other words, you want to be able to fill up the bag and still be able to latch the front strap. We used a small pillow.
  8. Fold the flap down into position over the front of the bag. 
  9. Find the Swivel Clip and clip it onto the bottom D-Ring. 
  10. Slip the free end of the 1" webbing through the swivel clip and pull back the end until the webbing lays flat against the flap. When properly adjusted, pin the end of the webbing in place. If the pull-through is more than about 1”, trim away the excess webbing and heat seal the end again. 
     
  11. Thread the machine with thread to best match webbing in the top and bobbin. Lengthen the stitch.
  12. Release the swivel clip and bring the bag to the machine. Stitch across the webbing just below the clip to secure the end. We recommend stitching across twice or three times for extra security. 

Attach the remaining webbing straps

  1. Find the two remaining lengths of 1½” webbing, one at 12” and one at 44”, and the two remaining 1½” D-Rings.
  2. Heat seal both ends of both lengths of webbing.
  3. The shorter strap goes through the D-Ring strap loop on the right sidewall. 
  4. Since the ends are all heat sealed, just pull through the end about 1” and double or triple stitch across to secure. Make sure you thread the webbing from the front to the back so the heat-sealed end is on the inside of the strap.
  5. The opposite end of this short strap goes through both remaining D-Rings. Again, just pull through the end about 1” and then double or triple stitch across to secure. Make sure you thread the webbing from the front to the back as above so the end is on the inside of the strap. 
  6. The longer strap goes through the D-Ring strap loop on the left sidewall in the same manner.
  7. The opposite end of this longer strap remains free. Feed this end through the double D-Rings to create the adjusting loop. to do this, slip the end through both rings then back through just one ring. 

Contributors

Project Design: Alicia Thommas    
Sample Creation and Instructional Outline: Debbie Guild

Tags: 

Section: 

Comments (4)

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Jane - Thank you so much! It's definitely one of our favorites!

Angela Maneth said:
Angela Maneth's picture

Love, love, love this! My nephew is a typography artist. This would be perfect for him!

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Angela - Thanks so much! Oh for sure - it does sound perfect for your nephew.

Add new comment

*Sew4Home reserves the right to restrict comments that don’t relate to the article, contain profanity, personal attacks or promote personal or other business.
By submitting this form, you accept the Mollom privacy policy.