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ScrapBusters: Lace Overlay Clutch

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It’s garden party season! Outdoor gatherings for wedding, reunions, and more are the stuff of spring and summer – and the ultimate excuse to pull out your party finery. This handsome clutch uses a solid linen with a narrow lace overlay to set a fresh and fancy tone. 

One of our goals with the ScrapBusters series is to show you unique ways to use (ie. to part with) some of your favorite scraps.

This elegant clutch blends a natural warm gray linen with 22” of gorgeous lace. The smooth linen peeks through the lace overlay for a lovely textured combination. Our bridal lace scrap featured sequins and seed beads integrated into the motif for a bit of extra sparkle. For the best look and to avoid any hemming, choose a lace that is finished on both sides.

A beautiful metallic cotton makes the lining as luxurious as the exterior.

We added simple grosgrain ribbon accents to both of the exterior panels as well as the lining pocket. A flat, tuxedo-style bow highlights the front ribbon. 

Experiment with your favorite combination, but we do recommend a darker exterior fabric in order for it to best show through the open weave of the lace. 

Our clutch finish at approximately 7" high x 10" wide.

Sewing Tools You Need

Fabric and Other Supplies

  • ½ yard of 45"+ wide linen blend or similar solid fabric for the exterior panels and zipper tabs; we used an Essex Linen in warm gray by Robert Kaufman from our stash
  • ½ yard of 45"+ wide quilting weight fabric for the lining and lining pocket; we used a white cotton with metallic crowns; an older Michael Miller fabric from our stash
  • ¾ yard of 5” - 6” wide decorative lace for the overlay; we used a 5¼” bridal lace from our stash
    NOTE: As mentioned above, for the best look and to avoid any hemming, choose a lace that is finished on both sides.
  • 1¼ yards of ½” wide ribbon; we used a dark gray grosgrain from our stash
  • ½ yard of 20”+ lightweight fusible interfacing; we used Shir-Tailor by Pellon
  • ¼ yard of 20”+ lightweight fusible interfacing; we used Thermolam Plus by Pellon
  • One 9" metallic zipper; we used a 9" YKK Brasstique zipper in White with Antique Brass teeth, purchased locally 
  • All purpose thread to match fabrics
  • See through ruler
  • Seam gauge
  • Seam ripper
  • Fabric pencil, pen or chalk
  • Iron and ironing board
  • Pressing cloth to protect lace and metallic cotton
  • Scissors or rotary cutter and mat
  • Straight pins
  • Hand sewing needle

Getting Started

  1. From the fabric for the exterior panels and zipper tabs, cut the following:
    TWO 8" high x 11" wide rectangles for the exterior panels 
    TWO 1¼" x 2½" strips for the zipper tabs
  2. From the fabric for the lining, cut the following:
    TWO 8” high x 11” wide rectangles
    ONE 7½” wide x 9” high rectangle for the pocket
  3. From the lace, fussy cut TWO 11” panels.
  4. From the lightweight interfacing, cut the following:
    TWO 7” x 10” rectangles for the exterior panels
    ONE 6½” x 4” rectangle for the lining pocket
  5. From the fusible fleece, cut TWO 7” x 10” rectangles.
  6. From the ribbon, cut the following lengths:
    TWO at 11” for the front and back accents
    ONE at 6” for the front bow
    ONE at 1¼” for the front bow’s center wrap
    ONE at 7½” for the lining pocket accent
  7. The image below shows you the parts cut out for our clutch.

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

Front and back panels with zipper

  1. Find the two exterior panels and the two large rectangles of fusible interfacing. 
  2. Center the interfacing on the wrong side of each exterior panel so there is ½” of fabric showing beyond the interfacing on all sides. 
  3. Following manufacturer's instructions, fuse the interfacing in place.
  4. Place the interfaced front panel right side up on your work surface. 
  5. Find the zipper. It should be centered along the top of the panel with the zipper pull to the right.
  6. Find the two zipper tabs, place one tab on each end of the zipper. The tab and the zipper are right sides together. Pin each tab in place. 
  7. Thread the machine with thread to best match the exterior fabric in the top and bobbin.
  8. Stitch each tab in place, running your short seam just below the bottom zipper stop and just above the top zipper stops. Move the zipper pull out of the way when stitching along the top. 
  9. Fold each tab out into position. Press in place.
  10. Find the front exterior panel again and place it right side up and flat on your work surface. 
  11. Place the zipper unit right side down (zipper teeth down). Center the top edge of the zipper tape side to side across the top of the panel. The tabs will extend to either side. The zipper should be open about half way.
  12. Pin in place along the top edge of the zipper tape. 
  13. Attach your Zipper foot. Stitch the zipper to the fabric panel, running the seam about ⅛" from the zipper teeth.
  14. When you can start to feel you're approaching the zipper pull, stop with your needle in the down position. 
  15. Twist your fabric around slightly and carefully close the zipper. Re-position your fabric and finish sewing to the end. Be very careful and go slowly; you want your seam line to be super-duper straight.
  16. Pin the remaining raw edge of the zipper tape to the exterior back panel, following the same steps as above, and stitch in place.
  17. Press the panels away from the zipper. You now have panels stitched in place on either side of the zipper and the excess width is neatly filled in with the zipper tabs. 
  18. Still using your Zipper foot, edgestitch along both sides of the zipper within the panels. As above, you'll need to open and close the zipper in order to stitch past the zipper pull with a straight seamline. 
  19. Trim away any excess zipper tab extending beyond the edge of the fabric panel at either side.

Add the lace overlay and ribbon accent

  1. Place the exterior panel unit right side up and flat on your work surface. The zipper should be closed with the pull to the right. 
  2. Find the two lace panels. 
  3. Place one lace panel right side up on the front panel. The front panel will be the “bottom” panel as the exterior unit is sitting on your work surface. 
  4. The lace panel should be positioned so its top edge is just below the topstitching along the zipper. The sides of the lace panel are flush with the fabric panel. Pin the lace in place. 
  5. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the lace in the top and bobbin. 
  6. Still using a Zipper foot for the best maneuverability, stitch along the top edge of the lace, following its finished edge. Our lace had a scalloped edge we followed. Stitch only along the top. The sides and bottom edge of the lace are not stitched.
  7. Find one of the 11” lengths of ribbon
  8. The exact position of the ribbon will vary based on your lace. You want it no more than about ½” - ¾” from the lace’s finished bottom edge. Adjust the position through the lace’s motif so it looks good. We placed our ribbon ½” up from the bottom edge of the lace, centering it through the flower motif. Use your see-through ruler as a guide to help make sure the ribbon is parallel to the lace panel
  9. Pin the ribbon in place. 
  10. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the ribbon in the top and bobbin. 
  11. Edgestitch the ribbon in place along both long sides and across both ends. This stitching is what holds the bottom of the lace panel in place. The very bottom edge of the lace panel is still free.
  12. Repeat to attach the remaining lace panel and remaining 11” length of ribbon to the back exterior panel in the same manner. 
  13. Find the 6” length of ribbon for the bow and the 1¼” length for its center wrap.
  14. Fold the 6” ribbon in half so it is now 3”, aligning the raw ends. Stitch the ends together, using a ¼” seam allowance, to form a loop. Turn the loop right side out and center the seam at the back.
  15. Thread the hand sewing needle with thread to match the ribbon. 
  16. Hand sew one raw end of the 1¼” ribbon to the center back of the bow. 
  17. Wrap short center ribbon around the front of the loop, bringing the remaining raw end to the back to overlap the original stitching. Do not cinch the center wrap. It should sit flat against the loop. You want the bow to have a flat, tuxedo style look. Whip stitch the ends together at the back of the bow.
  18. Position the bow along the front panel accent ribbon. It should sit at the left side of the ribbon, 3½” in from the left raw edge of the fabric panel. 
  19. Hand stitch the bow in place through all the layers. 

Finish the exterior

  1. Make sure the zipper is open at least half way. 
  2. Fold the front and back panels right sides together, aligning the raw edges along both sides and across the bottom. Be especially careful to line up the ribbon along each side. Pin in place.
  3. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the exterior fabric in the top and bobbin. 
  4. Re-attach the standard presser foot.
  5. Using a ½" seam allowance, stitch along both sides and across the bottom, pivoting at the bottom corners. Use a substantial backstitch at both the beginning and end of your seam to reinforce these stress points at either end of the zipper. 
  6. When done, clip the corners and grade the seam allowance to reduce bulk. 
  7. Turn the exterior pouch right side out

Create the lining and its pocket

  1. Find the two lining pieces and the two pieces of fusible fleece. 
  2. Center the fleece on the wrong side of each lining panel so there is ½” of fabric showing beyond the fleece on all sides. 
  3. Following manufacturer's instructions, fuse the fleece in place.
  4. Find the pocket panel and the small rectangle of lightweight interfacing.
  5. Fold the pocket panel in half, wrong sides together, and press to set a center crease line. Open the panel wrong side up so the crease line is visible. 
  6. Place the interfacing against the bottom half of the pocket panel. Its top edge should be aligned with the center crease and there should be ½” of fabric showing beyond the interfacing along both sides and across the bottom. 
  7. Following manufacturer's instructions, fuse the interfacing in place.
  8. Flip the pocket panel so it is right side up 
  9. Find the 7½” length of ribbon. Place it along the center crease line. Pin the ribbon in place. 
  10. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the ribbon in the top and bobbin. 
  11. Edgestitch the ribbon in place along both 7½” sides. We switched back to our Zipper foot. 
  12. Fold the pocket panel in half again along the center crease line, but right sides together this time. 
  13. Pin along both sides and across the bottom, leaving an approximate 3” opening at the center of the bottom edge.
  14. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the lining in the top and bobbin. Re-attach the standard presser foot. 
  15. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch along both sides and across the bottom. Remember to pivot at each corner and top lock your seam at either side of the 3” opening. 
  16. Clip the corners and press open the seam allowances.
  17. Turn the pocket right side out through the bottom opening. Use a long, blunt tool, such as a knitting needle or chopstick, to gently push out the corners so they are nice and sharp. Press the pocket flat, pressing in the raw edges at the opening so they are flush with the sewn seam. We used a pressing cloth to protect the metallic motifs on our cotton fabric. 
  18. Find one of the main lining panels. Place it right side up on your work surface. 
  19. Place the pocket right side up on the lining panel. The pocket should be centered top to bottom and side to side on the lining panel.  
  20. Pin the pocket in place along both sides and across the bottom.
  21. Edgestitch the pocket in place along both sides and across the bottom, pivoting at the corners and using a substantial backstitch at both the start and finish of the seam as extra security at the top corner stress points of the pocket. 
  22. Place the lining panels right sides together, sandwiching the pocket between the layers. Pin along both sides and across the bottom.
  23. Using a ⅝" seam allowance, stitch along both sides and across the bottom, pivoting at the corners.

    NOTE: In order for the lining to sit flat inside the exterior, it's best if the lining is sewn just a bit smaller than the exterior. We used a ⅝" seam allowance on the lining rather than the standard ½".
  24. Clip the corners.
  25. Fold down the top raw edge of the lining ½" all around. Press in place.

Assemble the exterior and lining to finish

  1. Find the exterior. It should be right side out.
  2. Turn the lining wrong side out. Slip the lining inside the exterior so the two layers are now wrong sides together. The lining pocket should be against the back exterior panel. 
  3. Align the bottom and side seams. The top folded edge of of the lining should fall below the zipper teeth by about ⅛". If it doesn't, adjust the fold to fit and gently re-press.
  4. Pin the layers together along the edge of the zipper. 

  5. Thread the hand sewing needle with thread to best match the lining.
  6. Slip stitch the lining to the bag, using very small stitches. Stitch along the front and the back, but leave the lining loose where it wraps over the side seams. This allows some "give" in the lining so it folds smoothly as you zip the bag open and shut.

Contributors

Project Design: Alicia Thommas
Sample Creation and Instructional Outline: Debbie Guild

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Comments (7)

Serafina C said:
Serafina C's picture

How pretty. On my "to make" list now. Love the little dangling pearl from the zipper, where can I find that?

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Serafina - We made that little charms from jewelry pieces we had on hand. You could do the same or you could even re-purpose an old earring or other charm. Many larger craft stores have nice selections of beads and charms as well as other jewelry findings. 

Coastal Sewist said:

I love this! What a simple lovely use for lace. And yes, great for gifts too :-) Thank you!

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

WCoastal Sewist - You're welcome. It is a fast and easy project with a very elegant result.

Jane Coombs said:
Jane Coombs's picture

Think I just found this year's small gift project for our European friends that arrive at Thanksgiving. I inherited 13 bolts of lace from a friend who switched design majors. This is a good use for the lace. Thanks.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@ Jane - This sounds like the perfect project for your lace!

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