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Custom Zipper Pouch in Three Styles: Dritz® Labels

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One of the top “Mother Skills” is the ability to carry all kinds of things at one time, expertly balancing everything in two hands without breaking a sweat. Perhaps it’s this inherent capability that leads to another one of her top talents: the ability to fall in love with all kinds of other “carryalls” – bags, pouches, and totes! With Mother’s Day right around the corner, we have not one, not two, but three cute zippered pouches for Mom to use to transport life’s little necessities. We chose three specialty Dritz® Labels to customize each pouch, and we offer a free printable set of Mother’s Day Gift Tags as the finishing touch. 

The construction of the three pouches is very similar. Each option is made up of matching panel pairs front and back: one diagonal, one horizontal, and one vertical. The diagonal pouch sports a Dritz® Leather Label and leather lacing zipper pull.

The horizontal pouch features a Dritz® Cloth Quilt Label and a unique tassel on the zipper pull made from unraveled cotton cording.

And the vertical pouch has a handy wrist strap with a fashionable Dritz® Metal Label. The strap clips on and off the zipper pull with a Dritz® Swivel Hook.

Make a coordinated set like we did or design each one individually to best suit the recipient’s favorite colors and/or designs. This is a great option if you have several “moms” in your life who need a unique gift: mom, stepmom, mother-in-law, grandmom… there are lots of Dritz® Labels from which to choose, so each pouch can be personalized.

The solid green canvas we choose as the “continuity fabric” across our trio was quite stable and so didn’t need any additional support. Therefore, on our samples, we opted to interface only the coordinating fabrics on each pouch. Depending on the weight of your fabrics, you may need to add the lightweight fusible interfacing to one or both pieces of your exterior panels.

We show you all the steps for a tabbed-end zipper that is cut to an exact width for the top opening. The tabs are completely finished so the zipper can sit slightly above the side seams with a tiny gap at each end. You may have seen this same technique on zipper pouches you’ve purchased at the store. It’s a great option to reduce bulk and make the pouch easier to turn right side out. 

A metal zipper coordinated beautifully with our Dritz® Labels and Hardware, but the technique shown below would work just as well with a standard plastic zipper. We show you how we cut the zipper to fit, but remember, when cutting a metal zipper, never use your good sewing scissors; always pull out the utility scissors from the junk drawer!

Because we are offering three different styles within this one project, some instruction sections are condensed to keep the steps manageable. If you are a new sewer and want a bit more detail as well as a few more photos, take a look at our Classic Zipper Pouch tutorial.

Our thanks to Dritz® for sponsoring this fabulous project for Mother’s Day and beyond. We are especially thrilled when our sponsors give us the chance to offer you free printable downloads, like this project’s lovely Mother’s Day Gift Tags. Simply print, cut, and attach. We added a bit of extra bling (and reinforcement!) by using Dritz® Eyelets for the hole. Punch a hole with a Dritz® Awl, insert the eyelet through the hole front to back, and use Dritz® Eyelet Pliers to seal. Add a handwritten note on the back of the tag to celebrate Mom’s special day.

Dritz® always have lots of fun ideas and products to make your sewing easier and more creative. To find out more, we invite you to visit their website or blog; or follow them on Pinterest, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube

You can find Dritz® notions and hardware at fine in-store and online retailers everywhere

Each of our pouches finishes at approximately 7½” wide x 6” high x 1½” deep.

Sewing Tools You Need

Fabric and Other Supplies

For Pouch Style A - Diagonal Cut

For Pouch Style B - Horizontal Cut

  • ONE Dritz® Cloth Quilting Label; we used the Handmade option in chocolate brown
  • ¼ yard of 44”+ wide lightweight canvas or similar in a dark solid
  • ⅛ yard of 44”+ wide lightweight canvas or similar in a coordinating light solid
  • ¼ yard of 44”+ wide quilting weight cotton for the lining
  • Scrap or ¼ yard of 20”+ wide lightweight fusible interfacing; we used 20” Pellon Shape Flex
  • ¼ yard of 20”+ wide fusible fleece; we used Pellon Thermolam Plus
  • ONE 6” - 7” zipper in a coordinating color; we used a 7” Coats metal zipper in Natural, cutting it for an exact fit
  • ONE 12mm split ring in nickel
  • ¼ yard of thin cotton twisted cord for the zipper pull tassel

For Pouch Style C – Vertical Cut

  • ONE Dritz® Metal Label; we used the Handmade option in gunmetal
  • ONE ½” Dritz® Swivel Hook; we used ½” nickel hook and ring set, saving the ½” D-ring in our stash for a future project
  • ⅛ yard of 44”+ wide lightweight canvas or similar in a dark solid
  • ⅓ yard of 44”+ wide lightweight canvas or similar in a bold print; this amount includes extra to allow for precise fussy cutting of a larger motif, such as our lazy herringbone
  • ¼ yard of 44”+ wide quilting weight cotton for the lining
  • Scrap or ¼ yard of 20”+ wide lightweight fusible interfacing; we used 20” Pellon Shape Flex
  • ¼ yard of 20”+ wide fusible fleece; we used Pellon Thermolam Plus
  • ONE 6” - 7” zipper in a coordinating color; we used a 7” Coats metal zipper in Natural, cutting it for an exact fit
  • ONE 12mm split ring in nickel
  • ½ yard of ½” wide webbing in a coordinating color for the wrist strap; we used black poly webbing
  • Dritz® Fray Check, optional for the webbing ends

For All The Pouches

  • All-purpose thread to match fabric, trim, and labels as appropriate
  • See-through ruler
  • Fabric pen or pencil
  • Iron and ironing board
  • Scissors
  • Utility scissors for cutting the zipper; if using a longer metal zipper
  • Rotary cutter and mat
  • Seam gauge
  • Seam ripper
  • Straight pins
  • Small hammer to set rivets; we recommend a soft leather mallet or a ball peen hammer
  • Heavy metal, stone or wooden block to use as a cutting and hammering surface; we use a small granite block

Getting Started, Pattern Download, and Gift Tag Download

  1. If creating Pouch Style A - Diagonal Cut, download and print the TWO pattern pieces required. These two pieces have been bundled into one PDF file to make the download easier.
    IMPORTANT: This pattern download consists of TWO 8½" x 11" sheets. You must print the PDF file at 100%. DO NOT SCALE to fit the page. There is a guide rule on each sheet to confirm your printout it to scale.
  2. Cut out the pattern pieces along the solid lines. Butt together the two Print Fabric pieces at the arrows as indicated. Do not overlap. Tape together to form the complete Print Fabric pattern piece.
  3. If you’d like to print our pretty Mother’s Day Gift Tags, it is available here as a .PDF file. Click the image below to download. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader DC, which is a free program.



  4. We’ve minimized the file size, but please be patient with the download process. In addition, make sure you have the latest version of Acrobat Reader DC, and the latest version of your printer driver. Adobe does always recommend a re-start of your computer with any update.
  5. If you are experiencing printing issues, you can also try the Print as Image option in your printer’s browser window. This option is often under the Advanced tab. You can also save the downloaded PDF to your computer and print from there.

Pouch Style A - Diagonal Cut

  1. From the solid fabric, cut the following:
    ONE 2” x 2½” strip for the zipper tabs
    Use the Solid Fabric Pattern to cut TWO
  2. From the print fabric, use the Print Fabric Pattern to cut TWO.

    NOTE: We added some helpful guide lines on our pattern should you use a bold motif similar to ours. There is a large circle to use to line up a feature motif in each (front and back) bottom corner. And, there is a base line to use to best determine where to position the motif along what will become the bottom of the pouch after the box bottom is completed.
  3. From the fabric for the lining, cut TWO 8½” x 7½” rectangles.
  4. From the lightweight interfacing, cut ONE using the Print Fabric Pattern.
    NOTE: Our solid canvas (the green) was quite stable and didn’t need additional support, so we opted to interface only the print fabric. As mentioned above, depending on the weight of your fabrics, you may need the lightweight interfacing on one or both pieces of the exterior.
  5. From the fusible fleece, cut TWO 7½” x 6½” rectangles.

Pouch Style B - Horizontal Cut

  1. From the dark fabric, cut the following:
    TWO 8½” x 5¾” rectangles
    ONE 2” x 2½” strip for the zipper tabs
  2. From the light fabric, cut TWO 8½” x 3” rectangles.
  3. From the fabric for the lining, cut TWO 8½” x 7½” rectangles.
  4. From the lightweight interfacing, cut TWO 8½” x 3” rectangles.
    NOTE: Our darker canvas (the green) was quite stable and didn’t need additional support, so we opted to interface only the lighter fabric (a poplin). As mentioned above, depending on the weight of your fabrics, you may need the lightweight interfacing on one or both pieces of the exterior.
  5. From the fusible fleece, cut TWO 7½” x 6½” rectangles.

Pouch Style C - Vertical Cut

  1. From the solid fabric, cut the following:
    TWO 3” x 7¾” rectangles
    ONE 2” x 2½” strip for the zipper tabs
  2. From the print fabric, fussy cut TWO 6½” wide x 7¾” high rectangles.
  3. From the fabric for the lining, cut TWO 8½” x 7½” rectangles.
  4. From the lightweight interfacing, cut TWO 6½” x 7¾” rectangles.
    NOTE: Our darker canvas (the green) was quite stable and didn’t need additional support, so we opted to interface only the print fabric. As mentioned above, depending on the weight of your fabrics, you may need the lightweight interfacing on one or both pieces of the exterior.
  5. From the fusible fleece, cut TWO 7½” x 6½” rectangles.

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

Prepare the exterior panels

Pouch Style A - Diagonal Cut

  1. Find the exterior triangles and the lightweight interfacing. Place the interfacing on the wrong side of one or both triangles for both the front and the back pairs. As mentioned above, we interfaced only the print triangles.
  2. Transfer the marking dot from each pattern piece onto each appropriate fabric piece.
  3. Aligning these two dots, place each print and solid rectangle right sides together and pin along the diagonal.
  4. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch together each pair.
  5. Press open the seam allowance first for a crisp line.
  6. Then press the seam allowance together and towards the print panel.
  7. Re-thread with thread to best match the darker fabric in the top and bobbin, slightly lengthen the stitch. Topstitch in place within the print panel.
  8. Find the fusible fleece rectangles. Place a fleece panel on the wrong side of each assembled exterior panel. The fleece should be centered so there is ½” of fabric showing beyond the fleece on all sides. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place.

Pouch Style B - Horizontal Cut

  1. Find the dark and light rectangles and the lightweight interfacing. Place the interfacing on the wrong side of one or both rectangles for both the front and the back pair. As mentioned above, we interfaced only the upper light rectangles.
  2. Place each light/dark rectangle pair right sides together, aligning their center 8½” sides, Pin in place.
  3. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch together each pair.
  4. Press open the seam allowance first for a crisp line.
  5. Then press the seam allowance together and towards the bottom panel.
  6. Re-thread with thread to best match the darker fabric in the top and bobbin, slightly lengthen the stitch. Topstitch in place within the darker panel. We used our Janome Edge Guide foot for a super precise seam.
  7. Find the fusible fleece rectangles. Place a fleece panel on the wrong side of each assembled exterior panel. The fleece should be centered so there is ½” of fabric showing beyond the fleece on all sides. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place.

    NOTE: ** You can also stitch the label in place before fusing the fleece in place. This is an option that can allow the label to lay flatter against the fabric as the fleece will give the stitching a bit of depth. 

Pouch Style C - Vertical Cut

  1. Find the solid and print rectangles and the lightweight interfacing. Place the interfacing on the wrong side of one or both rectangles for both the front and the back pair. As mentioned above, we interfaced only the larger print rectangles.
  2. Place each solid/print rectangle pair right sides together, aligning their vertical center 7¾” sides, Pin in place.
  3. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch together each pair.
  4. Press open the seam allowance first for a crisp line.
  5. Then press the seam allowance together and towards the solid panel.
  6. Re-thread with thread to best match the solid fabric in the top and bobbin, slightly lengthen the stitch. Topstitch in place within the darker panel. We again used our Janome Edge Guide foot for a super precise seam.
  7. Find the fusible fleece rectangles. Place a fleece panel on the wrong side of each assembled exterior panel. The fleece should be centered so there is ½” of fabric showing beyond the fleece on all sides. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place.

Prepare the zipper with its zipper tabs

  1. We’re showing the zipper installation on Pouch Style C. The steps are the same for all styles.
  2. Find the zipper and the zipper tab.
  3. If necessary, re-thread the machine with thread to best match the tab fabric in the top and bobbin and re-set the stitch length to normal.
  4. Fold the zipper tab in half, wrong sides together, so it is now 1" x 2½”. Press to set a center crease line.
  5. Unfold wrong side up so the crease line is visible. Fold in the raw edges so they meet in the center at the crease line.
  6. Press both folds, then fold in half again along the original crease line and press once more. Your finished piece should now be ½” x 2½”. 
  7. Cut in half so you have TWO ½” x 1¼” tab pieces.
  8. Open up the zipper about halfway. 
  9. Open up one of the tabs along the center crease line.
  10. Slip the top ends of the zipper into the tab. The ends of the zipper tape should be flush with one folded-in side of the tab. The top metal stops of the zipper ends should sit just outside the fold of the tab. If they don’t, trim the zipper ends slightly to adjust the fit. We trimmed our zipper ends for a smooth fit. Keeping the ends together - ie. so the teeth are side by side, pin in place. 
  11. Stitch the zipper ends in place. It’s okay if this stitching is messy, it will be covered within the folds of the tab. We attached our Zipper foot and moved our needle position all the way over to the left. 
  12. Re-fold the tab along the original crease line, sandwiching the zipper ends between the layers. Pin in place; the inner folds should be flush on either side of the zipper.
  13. Edgestitch in place, close to the inner folds. This edgestitching should be as neat as possible as it will be visible. 
  14. Find the front exterior panel. Place it right side up on your work surface. 
  15. Measure ½” in from each side edge.
  16. Mark each side with a pin. 
  17. Find the zipper with its top tab in place. 
  18. Place the zipper right side down on the front panel with the already-tabbed top end of the zipper at the ½” pin mark at the right edge of the panel. The side edge of the zipper tape should be flush with the top raw edge of the front panel. Pin this end in place.
  19. Smooth the zipper into position across the top and mark the bottom end of the zipper tape at the ½” mark at the left edge of the panel. Place a pin at either side of the zipper tape. This is where the zipper will be trimmed to fit if necessary.
  20. Find the remaining zipper tab. Open it up along the center crease line.
  21. Place the bottom end of the zipper right side up on top of the opened tab. The lower folded edge of the tab should be flush with the marking pins that denote your trim point. Pin through the zipper and the tab.
  22. Stitch across the zipper close to the lower folded edge. Remember, if need be, to hand walk across the metal zipper teeth to avoid damage to your needle.
  23. Remove from the machine and snip through the zipper tape to either side of the teeth. These snips should be in line with the raw edge of the tab.
  24. Find the utility scissors and carefully cut around the zipper teeth, shortening the zipper to fit within the tab. Discard the excess zipper and clean up the cut edge as necessary.
  25. Wrap the tab around the cut end. As above, the folded ends should be flush on either side of the zipper. Pin in place.
  26. Edgestitch the tab in place. 

Insert the zipper between the exterior and the lining

Place the front panel right side up again on your work surface. 

Pin the zipper in place across the top, double checking that the zipper and the panel are right sides together, that each tabbed end sits ½” in from the sides of the panel, and that the zipper pull is situated so, when closed, it’s to the right of the front piece (if your fabric panels do not have a distinct front and back, this zipper pull position is not critical, but in general, pouches open right to left). After checking the position open the zipper about half way.

Find one lining panel. Place the lining panel right side down on top of the front panel, sandwiching the zipper between the layers. 

The top raw edge of the lining panel should be aligned with the other layers. Pin well. 

Stitch across the top through all three layers, using a ¼” seam. 

NOTE: As with all zipper insertions, when you feel you are approaching the zipper pull, stop with your needle in the down position. Raise the presser foot and twist the layers slightly so you can access the pull to move it out of the way of the presser foot. Once clear, drop the presser foot, re-position the layers, and finish the seam. 

Fold the lining back so the front panel and the lining are now wrong sides together and the remaining free side of the zipper tape is sticking up. Press. 

Find the back exterior panel and the remaining lining panel. Make a second sandwich similar to the first one. Place the back exterior panel right sides together with the front exterior panel, aligning the top raw edge with the free edge of the zipper tape. Lightly pin in place. 

Place the remaining lining panel right sides together with the in-place lining panel. The top raw edge of this second lining panel should also be flush with the free edge of the zipper tape. As with the first sandwich, you have sandwiched the remaining free edge of the zipper between the back exterior panel and the remaining lining panel. The two exterior panels are right sides together and the two lining panels are right sides together. Pin in place through all the layers.

Stitch through all three layers along this second side of the zipper, again using a ¼” seam.

As you did above, fold the exterior back and lining wrong sides together and press.

Open up the entire unit so it lays flat. The exterior front and lining are wrong sides together to one side and the exterior back and lining are wrong sides together to the other side with the zipper in the middle. Press well and pin in place. 

Lengthen the stitch. Edgestitch along the zipper teeth on either side on the zipper to hold the fabric layers together, stopping to move the zipper pull out of the way as needed so you can maintain a straight seam along either side.

NOTE: We have slightly summarized the zipper insertion steps here. If you are brand new to this technique, take a look at our Classic Zipper Pouch tutorial for additional steps and photos.

Add the leather and cloth labels to Pouch Style A and Pouch Style B + Add the metal label and wrist strap to Pouch C

Pouch Style A-Diagonal Cut

  1. Find the Dritz® Leather Label, the two Dritz® Double Cap Rivets, and the Dritz® Rivet Tools, as well as your hammer and setting surface.
  2. Find the exact center of the front exterior panel and the center of the Dritz® Leather Label.
  3. Align these two center points with the top of the label sitting ½” below the edge stitching seam along the zipper.
  4. Mark both points at either side of the label.
  5. Cut holes with the cutting tool at each marked point.

  6. Set the back rivet cap into position through the hole from back to front. As mentioned above, you should use a very hard surface to hammer against for the best seal. We like to use a small block of granite.
  7. Place the front cap onto the stud of the back cap, and, using the setting anvil, hammer to seal.
  8. Repeat to add the rivet at the opposite end.
  9. Once again setting to seal.

    NOTE: Riveting is easier than you might think (especially with the Dritz® tools), and we’ve summarized the steps above. If you’re brand new, check out our Metal Rivets Tutorial.

Pouch Style B-Horizontal Cut

  1. Find the Dritz® Cloth Quilt Label.
  2. Find the exact center of the front exterior panel and the center of the Dritz® Quilt Label.
  3. Align these two center points with the top of the label sitting ½” below the horizontal seam.
  4. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the label in the top and bobbin. Slightly lengthen the stitch.
  5. Edgestitch the label in place.

    NOTE: ** You can also stitch label in place early-on, before fusing the fleece in place as mentioned above. This is an option that can allow the label to lay flatter against the fabric as the fleece will give the stitching a bit of depth. This was our choice for our prototype sample.

Pouch Style C-Vertical Cut

  1. Find the Dritz® Metal Label, the Dritz® Swivel Hook, and the webbing.
  2. Slip the webbing through the Dritz® Swivel Hook. Align the raw ends and pin them together.
  3. If possible, test the the loop size on the intended wearer. It shouldn’t need to be longer, but you might want it shorter for thinner wrists or younger wearers.
  4. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch the ends together. We suggest a double or triple stitch.
  5. Trim the seam allowance back to ¼”. Use a bead of Dritz Fray Check along the cut edge.
  6. Flip the loop so the seam allowance is now on the inside. Rotate it up towards the Dritz® Swivel Hook. Push the seam as close to the Hook as possible.
  7. Stitch across the webbing, running this seam as close to the Hook as possible. Again, we recommend a double or triple stitch.
  8. Center the Dritz® Metal Label on one side of the loop. Clip it in place.
  9. Thread a hand sewing needle with thread to best match the webbing.
  10. Securely hand stitch the Dritz® Metal Label in place. Remember, you are stitching through just one side of the loop… stitch through both sides and you can’t get your hand through!

Complete the pouch

  1. Make sure the zipper is open about half way. 
  2. Fold the exterior pieces right sides together. Align the raw edges along both sides and across the bottom. Be especially careful to line up the seam lines on the exterior panels. Pin in place.
  3. Fold the lining pieces right sides together. Align the raw edges along both sides and across the bottom. Pin in place, leaving an approximate 3” opening along the bottom of the lining layers for turning. 
  4. You again have one flat piece. This time the lining panels are to one side of the zipper and the exterior panels are to the other side of the zipper. 
  5. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch around the entire perimeter.
  6. You will be stitching alongside, but not on, the end tabs. The tabs remain free, so it may be easiest to stitch around the perimeter of the exterior layers first and then re-set to stitch around the lining layers. Remember to pivot at all the corners and to lock your seam at either side of the 3” opening at the bottom of the lining. 
  7. With the pouch wrong side out still, the next step is to box the bottom corners. 
  8. Our pouch is designed to have 1½” corners. To create this width, we figured the seam at half this width or ¾”.
  9. Pinch one corner so the side and bottom seams align, forming a little peak. 
  10. Measure ¾” in from the top of the seam and draw a line across the corner. 
  11. Stitch along this drawn line. We recommend a double or triple seam for extra security.
  12. Trim away the peak, leaving an approximate ¼” seam allowance. 
  13. Push the corner out into place
  14. Repeat to create the matching box seams at the remaining three corners. Remember, you are creating this box in all four corners, the two exterior corners and the two lining corners.
    NOTE: If you are brand new to boxed corners, we have a full step-by-step tutorial you can review prior to starting. 

Finishing touches

  1. Find the split ring for each pouch you are making.
  2. For Pouch Style A-Diagonal Cut, slip the split ring through the hole in the zipper pull, then thread the thin leather lacing through the split ring and secure. We simply folded the lacing in half, created a loop at the center, then fed the raw ends back through the loop – similar to how you’d attach a gift or price tag. Trim the raw ends to your desired length; our lacing tails are approximately 3”.
  3. For Pouch Style B-Horizontal Cut, slip the thin cotton twisted cord through the split ring.
  4. Create a small loop, then create a hitch knot. Un-ravel one strand of the twisted cord and use this to wrap around the tassel just below the knot, forming a neck and securing the knot in place. unravel the tails of the twisted cord below the neck, fluffing them up as you go. Trim the ends flush to your desired length. Our tassel ends below the neck are approximately 2”. Finally, slip the split ring through the hole in the zipper pull,
  5. For Pouch Style C-Vertical Cut, slip the split ring through the hole in the zipper pull, then clip the Dritz® Swivel Hook to the ring.

We received compensation from Dritz® for this project, and some of the materials featured here or used in this project were provided free of charge by Dritz®.  All opinions are our own.

Contributors

Project Design: Alicia Thommas   
Sample Creation: Debbie Guild

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Comments (4)

evsews said:
evsews's picture

I wish I knew how to make a hitch knot. I googled it and found about 30 different hitch knots, all with different names. You showed a photo of putting a cord through a split ring. I wish you would have shown the hitch knot instead

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@evsews - the "tassel fob" knot is really the same as the "leather fob" - that one is probably a bit easier to see. It's also called a "cow hitch" or we just call it a "price tag loop." The reason it may look differently to you is that we fluffed out the bottom to create the tassel. The great part is that with decorative embellishments like this, you can really do whatever you'd like 

scootertn said:
scootertn's picture

The labels make the pouches look so finished.  Alas, my sewing list grows longer.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@scootertn - Thank you! We really had fun picking the labels - so many to choose from. And... adding to them is what lists are for, right?!