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10-Pocket Purse Organizer: Get the Pro Look with Dritz Hardware

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This wonderful little caddy came about thanks to your requests on our You Asked 4 It list! Many of you had suggested we design a purse organizer. What are these brilliant little carriers? By loading up all your essentials into one multi-pocket pouch, all you need to do when you change bags is to switch the organizer from one to the other. It also makes it much easier to find those essentials – no more digging around at the bottom of your purse to locate your headphones! To give our custom organizer the very best form and function, we incorporated 10 Dritz® hardware products and tools. We’re often asked how we get such a professional look to all our samples. After thanking the person effusively for such a nice compliment, our reply always starts with one fundamental rule: use the right products and tools for the job. When you use products and tools that have been designed for a specific purpose, the installation is easier and the result is superior. 

The rivets, grommets, jeans buttons, and more that we chose for this organizer are all readily available products from our friends at Dritz®. And although you may end up with leftovers from the various packages, no worries – the original investment is minimal and it’s all stuff you should keep in your stash at all times. These are products that can always be incorporated into new projects, and of course, the tools can be re-used again and again. 

Our thanks to Dritz® for providing all the great hardware for this project! They always have lots of fun new ideas and products to keep your sewing easier and more creative. To find out more, we invite you to visit their website or blog; or follow them on Pinterest, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube

Our handy organizer features ten pockets, counting the main zippered interior section as one large pocket. The double layer pockets on both sides of the exterior feature laminate (outside), rip stop (lining), and mesh. This unique combination gives you a water resistant, wipe-clean surface, plus the mesh outer layer makes it super easy to see smaller items. 

It's a perfect option for your everyday bags, but as shown in our photos here, it's also great for packing toiletries for travel, keeping office supplies in your briefcase, or filling with sewing notions for classes and retreats. 

We added two grommets to allow you to clip keys securely in place, using your key ring’s own swivel hook or carabiner. These are the new Dritz Fashion Grommets that have a matte, rubberized finish. Awesome! Available in black and white, we chose black to match our pocket binding. The grommets are positioned directly above the mesh pockets to make it easy to clip a ring in place, then drop the keys themselves right into the pocket below so they don't flop around. 

There’s also an optional leash with a Metal Snap on one end and a Swivel Hook on the other. Use this to secure the pouch in place – an especially handy feature when using the pouch with larger bags and totes. 

We love the new Leather Labels from Dritz®. We added one to the front of our organizer, matching the color to the leather zipper pull. A label always adds a stylish finish to your project. 

As with most commercial bags, for the longest life, this bag is meant to be spot cleaned. All the elements are machine washable, and on a gentle cycle in cold water, you could get away with a full wash. However, we don’t recommend ever drying in the dryer; instead, let the bag air dry after any cleaning.

We offer links below to find the elements we used for our sample, but of course, you can find Dritz® notions and hardware at fine in-store and online retailers everywhere

Our organizer finishes at approximately 13½” wide x 8½” high with an approximate 11” detachable swivel hook leash. This is a bit smaller than many of the commercial organizers so it is more likely to fit into a wide variety of bags and totes, however the center pocket is still big enough to accomodate most digital tablets.

Sewing Tools You Need

Sewing Machine and standard presser foot

Teflon® type foot, such as the Janome UltraGlide foot, for stitching on the laminate

100/16 Denim Needle

Zipper Foot

Walking or Even Feed foot; optional but helpful when working with the multiple layers - or engage your machine’s built-in fabric feeding system, such as the Janome AcuFeed™ Flex system, which we used on our Janome Skyline S7

Fabric and Other Supplies

Getting Started

  1. From the main feature fabric (upholstery stripe in our sample), cut the following:
    TWO 14½” wide x 9½” high rectangles for the main exterior base panels – we cut ours with the stripes running vertically
    ONE 2” x 3” strip for the main exterior base panels – we cut ours with the stripes running horizontally
  2. From the fabric for the upper exterior pocket panels (laminate in our sample), cut TWO 14½” wide x 7½” high rectangles.
  3. From the fabric for the lower exterior pocket panels (mesh in our sample), cut TWO 14½” wide x 5½” high rectangles.
  4. From the fabric for the lining (rip stop in our sample), cut the following:
    TWO 14” wide x 9¼” high rectangles for the main lining base panels
    TWO 14” wide x 13” high rectangles for the lining pockets
    TWO 14½” wide x 7½” high rectangles for the exterior pocket lining panels 
  5. From the fusible foam, cut TWO 13½” x 8½” rectangles for the exterior panels.
  6. From the fusible fleece, cut TWO 13½” x 6½” rectangles for the upper exterior pockets.
  7. From the bias binding, cut TWO 14½” lengths and TWO 14” lengths. 
  8. From the grosgrain ribbon, cut ONE 13” length and ONE 2” length.
  9. From the leather thong, cut ONE 6” length.
    NOTE: You can actually leave the thong at the full 9” (¼ yard ) and simply trim it to the length you like best once it’s threaded through the zipper pull. 

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

Exterior upper pockets

  1. Find the cotton laminate panels, the matching rip stop panels, and the fusible fleece panels. 
  2. Place a fleece panel on the wrong side of each laminate panel. It should be centered so there is ½” of fabric showing beyond the interfacing on all four sides. 
  3. Using a pressing cloth to protect the laminate from excessive heat, and following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse the fleece in place on each panel. 
  4. Place a rip stop panel right sides together with each fused laminate panel. Pin or clip along the upper edge only. 
  5. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch along the upper edge only. 
    NOTE: We used our Janome UltraGlide foot.
  6. Bring the rip stop around to the back of the laminate so the two pieces (in each set) are now wrong sides together. Using a pressing cloth, press the upper edge so the seam line is crisp and straight. 
  7. If necessary, rethread the machine with thread to best match the laminate in the top and to best match the rip stop in the bobbin. Lengthen the stitch. We continued to use our Janome UltraGlide foot. 
  8. Edgestitch across the top of both pocket panels through both layers. 
    NOTE: If you’re having any trouble stitching the laminate, check out our full tutorial on Sewing with Sticky Stuff. 
  9. Find the center point along the top of one panel. At this point, mark for a ¾” horizontal buttonhole ½” down from the finished top edge of the pocket. This sizing is based on the Dritz® Jeans Button we chose. 
  10. Following the instructions for your machine, create the buttonhole. 
  11. Carefully cut open the buttonhole through both layers. Starting at one end of your buttonhole and working toward the middle, pierce the fabric with the point and cut half the slit. Be sure to stay exactly in the center so you cut only the fabric. Insert the seam ripper at the opposite end and work toward the middle until the slit is fully open.
    NOTE: For more tips and tricks, check out our full tutorial on basic machine sewn buttonholes. 

Create and overlay the lower mesh exterior pockets

  1. Find the two mesh panels, the two 14½” lengths of bias binding, and three of the Dritz® Double Cap Rivets. 
  2. Slip one length of bias tape over the top raw edge of each mesh panel. Note that one side of the bias tape is ever so slightly longer than the other. This slightly longer side should go against what will be the inside of the mesh pocket. Pin or clip the bias tape in place.
  3. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the bias tape in the top and bobbin but keep the lengthened stitch. Switch back to a standard presser foot.
  4. Edgestitch across each mesh panel through all the layers. Go slowly and carefully, making sure you are catching the front and back of the binding in this one seam.
  5. Find the two upper exterior pocket panels. Place them right side up and flat on your work surface. 
  6. Place a bound mesh pocket right side up on top of each laminate pocket. The side and bottom edges of the two layers should be flush. Pin or clip along the sides. Then, baste along each side of each layered panel.

Add the first level of pocket division seams and rivets

  1. On the layered pocket panel with the buttonhole (this is the back panel), Measure to find the exact center. Mark with pins or draw in a vertical guide line with a fabric pen from the bottom up to the top of the binding. Don’t go past the binding. 
    NOTE: The laminate and mesh is tricky to mark with a fabric pen or pencil. We used, and recommend, using pins to mark.
  2. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the laminate and mesh in the top and bobbin but keep the lengthened stitch.
  3. Stitch along the marked line. Again, you are stitching only from the bottom up to the top of the binding. 
    NOTE: Although we often take the time to change our thread color in situations such as this, we didn’t on this project because the little bit of the seam that crosses the binding will be mostly hidden behind the rivet. We used aqua thread throughout. 
  4. On the layered pocket panel without the buttonhole (this is the front panel), measure to find the exact center. Mark with pins or draw in a vertical guide line with a fabric pen from the bottom up to the top of the laminate pocket.
  5. With the taller center guide line in place, measure and mark parallel guide lines 4¾” to the right of center and 4¾” to the left of center. These guide lines go only from the bottom up to the top of the binding. As you did with the dividing line on the back panel, don’t go past the binding. 
  6. Stitch along the two outer guide lines only. DO NOT STITCH THE CENTER SEAM YET. 
  7. The illustrations below help you see our division lines, but bear in mind that it shows the finished width with the ½” side seams in place. You can follow our division points or create your own custom pocket divisions. 




  8. Collect three of the Dritz® Double Cap Rivets and the Rivet Tools.
  9. Add a rivet at the top of each seam line, centering it within the binding. Start by making a hole through all the layers with the Rivet Tools.
  10. We like using the Dritz® Rivet Tools because the resulting hole is so clean and even. 
  11. Insert the rivet top from the front through to the back. 
  12. Attach the back cap to the rivet post and set the cap into the concave indentation on the anvil. 
  13. Hammer in place. As you can see in the photo above, we are using a granite block as a base for our hammering. A solid surface is very important for the smoothest and easiest seal of the rivet.
    NOTE: The steps for riveting are really quite easy, but if you’re brand new to the technique, you can certainly review our general tutorial on How to Install Metal Rivets. You might also want to review all the rivets we used on our Dritz® Grommet and Rivet Bag as well as on our stylish Guitar Strap. 
  14. Set aside the pocket panels. 

Prepare the main exterior panels and place the pocket panels

  1. Find the main exterior panels (the stripe in our sample), the matching foam panels, and the Dritz® Leather Label. 
  2. On one of the exterior panels (this panel will become the front), measure 1” down from the top raw edge, then find the center point. Place the label over this center point. 
  3. Hand stitch the label in place. We recommend using a heavy thread or floss for bold stitching that will match the heft of the label. We used floss. 
  4. Place a foam panel on the wrong side of each fabric panel. It should be centered so there is ½” of fabric showing beyond the foam on all four sides. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse the foam in place on each panel.
  5. Using a pair of sharp scissors, trim back the foam at a slight diagonal on all sides. This will help grade the thickness of the foam more smoothly into the seams.
  6. Flip over the exterior panels so they are right side up and flat on your work surface. 
  7. Place the prepared front pocket panel with the two division seams right side up on the exterior panel to which you sewed the label. The sides and the bottom of all the layers should be flush. Clip or pin in place along the sides. 
  8. Re-check and re-mark the center division line as needed. Remember, this line goes from the bottom all the way up to the top of the laminated pocket. 
  9. Stitch along the marked line through all the layers (the pocket panels as well as the exterior panel/foam. 
  10. Find the remaining two Dritz® Double Cap Rivets. Place one through ALL the layers at the top center point of the laminated pocket. Place the second directly below the first, centered within the binding as you did with the original three rivets. Following the same steps as above, set these two rivets. Be firm and smooth with your insertion since you are going through quite a few layers. 
  11. Find the 2” length of ribbon and the Dritz® D-Ring.
  12. Slip the ribbon through the D-Ring and align the raw ends.
  13. Pin the ribbon/ring in place along the right side of the assemble front panel with raw ends flush with each other as well as with the side raw edge of the fabric. The ribbon should sit 1½” down from the top raw edge. Pin in place.
  14. Hand or machine baste in place. We machine basted in place, switching to our Janome UltraGlide foot.
  15. Place the prepared back pocket panel with the one center division seam and the buttonhole right side up on the remaining exterior panel. The sides and the bottom of all the layers should be flush. Clip or pin in place along the sides.
  16. Place a pin through the buttonhole to mark the position for the Dritz® Jeans Button on the main exterior panel behind. 
  17. Pull away the laminate/mesh pocket panel. Insert the base of the jeans button from the back through to the front at the marked point. 
  18. Snap the top into place and hammer to secure.
  19. Button in place. 
  20. With all the layering complete and the hardware in place (except the grommets — those will be added at the very end), machine baste through all the layers across the bottom and along both sides of both assembled exterior panels. We continued to use our Janome UltraGlide foot since we were stitching across the sticky surface of the laminate.

Create the lining

  1. Find all the rip stop pieces for the lining panels and pockets and the remaining two lengths of bias tape. 
  2. Fold the pocket panels in half, wrong sides together (although most rip stop doesn’t have an obvious right and wrong side) so each panel is now 14” wide x 6½” high. Hand crease or lightly press using a pressing cloth. 
  3. Place a length of binding across the folded edge of each pocket panel. We are using the folded edge as the top. When bound, it will be a bit more stable than two raw edges. Pin in place. As above with the mesh pocket panels, note that one side of the bias tape is ever so slightly longer than the other. This slightly longer side should go against what will be the inside of the pocket. Pin or clip the bias tape in place.
  4. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the bias tape in the top and bobbin. The stitch should still be lengthened. If need be, switch back to a standard presser foot.
  5. Edgestitch across each pocket panel through all the layers. Go slowly and carefully, making sure you are catching the front and back of the binding in this one seam.
  6. Place the main lining panels right side up and flat on your work surface.
  7. Place a bound pocket panel right side up on each lining panel. The sides and bottom raw edges of the panels should be flush. Pin or clip in place along the sides. 
  8. As you did on the front, put in all your pocket division guide lines. The rip stop is easier to mark, so we drew in our lines with a fabric pen. You can follow our divisions or create your own unique spacing. 
  9. The drawings below show you our division points (remember, this shows the finished lining – don’t forget to account for the ½” side seams when planning your lines). On one panel, we used just a single division line at the exact center. On the other panel we used four parallel lines: 3” in from the left raw edge for the first line, then 1½” to the right of this first line, 4” to the right of the second line, and 2” to the right of the third line. 



     
  10. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the rip stop in the top and bobbin. Keep the stitch lengthened and sew along each drawn line from the bottom raw edge up to the top of the binding. 

Prepare and attach the zipper tabs

  1. Find the zipper and the zipper tab.
  2. Fold the zipper tab in half, wrong sides together, so it is now 1" x 3". Finger press to set a center crease line.
  3. Unfold wrong side up so the crease line is visible. Fold in the raw edges so they meet at the crease line. 
  4. Finger press, then fold in half again along the original crease line and press with an iron. Your finished piece should now be ½” x 3”. 
  5. Cut in half so you have TWO ½” x 1½” tab pieces
  6. Open up the zipper halfway. 
  7. Open up one of the tabs along the center crease line.
  8. Slip the top end ends of the zipper into the tab. The ends of the zipper should be flush with one folded-in side of the tab. The top stops of the zipper ends (the top of the zipper pull) should sit just below the fold of the tab as shown in the photo.
  9. If things are fitting, trim the zipper ends slightly to adjust.
  10. With the zipper open, but keeping the zipper ends together - ie. side by side. Pin the zipper ends in place on the tab.
  11. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the main exterior fabric in the top and bobbin. Re-set the stitch length to normal. 
  12. Stitch the zipper ends in place. It’s okay if this stitching is messy, it will be covered within the folds of the tab. We attached our Zipper foot and moved our needle position all the way over to the left. 
  13. Re-fold the tab along the original crease line, sandwiching the zipper ends between the layers. Pin in place; the inner folds should be flush on either side of the zipper.
  14. Edgestitch in place, close to the inner folds. This edgestitching should be as neat as possible as it will be visible. 
  15. Find the front exterior panel. Place it right side up on your work surface. Measure ½” in from each side edge and mark with a pin.  
  16. Find the zipper with its top tab in place. It should still be unzipped about half way. 
  17. Place the zipper right side down on the front panel with the tabbed top end of the zipper at the ½” pin mark at the left edge of the panel. The side edge of the zipper tape should be flush with the top raw edge of the front panel. Pin in place. You can tell the wrong side of the zipper is facing up because that is our messier first seam line showing in the photo below. 
  18. Smooth the zipper into position across the top and mark the zipper tape at the ½” mark at the right edge of the panel. This is where the zipper will be trimmed to fit.
  19. Place a second pin directly opposite the first. You could also draw a line across the zipper at this point with fabric pen or pencil in a contrasting color. 
  20. Find the remaining end tab. Place the tab right side down on the wrong side of the zipper so the center of the tab aligns with the marking pins. In other words, one inner raw edge in aligned with this mark.
  21. Flatten the tab and place the zipper back down into place on the exterior panel to double check that the center of the tab is indeed aligned with your original ½” mark on the panel and that the opposite finished end still aligns with its ½” mark.
  22. Remove the zipper from the exterior panel. The zipper should be wrong side up. With the tab still flattened, stitch the tab in place along its inner fold. 
  23. Flip the zipper right side up and use the raw edges of the folded-in sides of the tab as your cutting guide to trim away the excess zipper end. Remember to use utility scissors for this step – not your good sewing scissors. 
  24. Bring the tab back around into position. You’ve now sandwiched this bottom end just as you did the top end. As above, the folded ends should be flush on either side of the zipper. Pin in place.
  25. Edgestitch the tab in place. 
  26. You now have a perfectly-sized zipper for your pouch with two neatly finished ends

Insert the zipper between the exterior and the lining

  1. Place the exterior front panel right side up again on your work surface. 
  2. Re-pin the zipper in place across the top, double checking that the zipper and the panel are right sides together, that each tabbed end sits ½” in from the sides of the panel, and that the zipper pull is situated so, when closed, it’s to the left of the front piece. After checking the position, open the zipper half way.
  3. Find one lining panel. Place the lining panel right side down (lining pockets down) on top of the front panel, sandwiching the zipper between the layers. 
  4. The top raw edge of the lining panel should be aligned with the other layers. Pin well. 
  5. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the main exterior fabric in the top and to best match the rip stop in the bobbin. Slightly lengthen the stitch. Keep this threading pattern and stitch length throughout this process. Don’t worry that some stitching shows up on the rip stop early on. Once all the seaming and turning is done, all will be well and everything will match. 
  6. Stitch across the top through all three layers, using a ¼” seam. We used a Zipper foot. 

    NOTE: All with all zipper insertions, when you feel you are approaching the zipper pull, stop with your needle in the down position. Raise the presser foot and twist the layers slightly so you can access the pull to move it out of the way of the presser foot. Once clear, drop the presser foot, re-position the layers, and finish the seam. 
  7. Fold the lining back so the front panel and the lining are now wrong sides together and the remaining free side of the zipper tape is sticking up. Press. 
  8. Find the back exterior panel and the remaining lining panel. Make a second sandwich similar to the first one. Place the back exterior panel right sides together with the front exterior panel, aligning the top raw edge of the back exterior panel with the free edge of the zipper tape. Lightly pin in place.  
  9. Place the remaining lining panel right sides together with the in-place lining panel. The top raw edge of the lining panel should also be flush with the free edge of the zipper tape. As with the first sandwich, you have sandwiched the remaining free edge of the zipper between the back exterior panel and the remaining lining panel. The two exterior panels are right sides together and the two lining panels are right sides together. Pin in place through all three layers.
  10. Stitch through all three layers along this second side of the zipper, again using a ¼” seam.
    NOTE: These steps follow our Classic Zipper Pouch instructions. If you are brand new, take a look at this original tutorial for additional helpful steps and photos. 
  11. As you did above, fold the exterior back and lining wrong sides together and press.
  12. Open up the entire unit so it lays flat. The exterior front and lining are wrong sides together to one side and the exterior back and lining are wrong sides together to the other side with the zipper in the middle. Press well, using a pressing cloth, and pin in place. 
  13. Edgestitch along the zipper teeth on either side on the zipper to hold the fabric layers together.
  14. Remember to stop to move the zipper pull out of the way so you can maintain a straight seam along either side.

Complete the pouch

  1. Make sure the zipper is open half way. 
  2. Fold the exterior pieces right sides together. Align the raw edges along both sides and across the bottom. Pin in place.
  3. Fold the lining pieces right sides together. Align the raw edges along both sides and across the bottom. Pin in place, leaving an approximate 3” opening along the bottom for turning. 
  4. You again have one flat piece; but this time, the lining panels are to one side of the zipper and the exterior panels are to the other side of the zipper. 
  5. Re-set the stitch length to normal. We switched to the Janome AcuFeed™ Flex fabric feeding system on our Skyline S7. You could also use a Walking foot. 
  6. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch around the entire perimeter. You will be stitching alongside, but not on, the zipper end tabs. The tabs remain free, so it may be easiest to stitch around the perimeter of the exterior layers first…

  7. … and then re-set to stitch around the lining layers. 
  8. Remember to pivot at all the corners and to lock your seam at either side of the 3” opening at the bottom of the lining. 
  9. Press open the seam allowance and clip the corners. As you can see in the photo above, we also finished the seam allowance on the lining side with a pinked edge as rip stop is prone to raveling. 
  10. Turn the bag right side out through the opening in the bottom of the lining.
  11. Once the bag is right side out, gently pull out the lining, fold in the raw edges of the opening so they are flush with the sewn seam, and edgestitch the opening closed.
  12. Push the lining back down inside the pouch. Using a long blunt tool, such as a chopstick, knitting needle or point turning, push out the upper and lower corners. Remember, as you push out the upper corners that the finished tab ends of the zipper are free from side seams; they sit just above the seam, making a teeny gap at each end. You've probably seen this on pouches before.

Add the grommets

  1. Find the two Dritz® Fashion Grommets and the Grommet Tools. 
  2. A grommet should be placed in the corner of both the front and back laminated pocket panels. Looking at the front panel, the grommet is in the upper right corner. Looking at the back panel, the grommet is in the upper left corner. Which means the two grommets are essentially back to back just below the D-Ring. 
  3. Each center of the grommet sits approximately 1” in from the side seam and ¾” up from the top bound edge of the mesh pocket. Use the grommet top to mark the placement for the hole. 
  4. Carefully cut out the holes with sharp scissors through all the layers of the pocket.
  5. Insert the grommet top from front to back and then snap the grommet back into position on the inside of the pocket. 
  6. Use the grommet tools to hammer and seal top to bottom.

    NOTE: The steps above are summarized. If you are brand new to this technique, take a look at our full tutorial on Installing Metal Grommets and Eyelets.

Create the optional swivel hook leash

  1. Find the remaining length of ribbon, the Dritz® Swivel Hook, and the Dritz® Snap and Snap Pliers. 
  2. Slip one end of the ribbon through the Swivel Hook. Tuck under the raw end ¼” and continue pulling through about ½”. Pin in place.
  3. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the ribbon in the top and bobbin. Attach a standard presser foot and re-set the stitch length to normal. 
  4. Stitch the across the ribbon through all the layers to secure the Swivel Hook. 
  5. At the opposite end, create a tiny hem. We folded back ¼” and then ¼” again. Stitch across to secure the hem.
  6. Using the Dritz® Snap Pliers, insert one half of the snap at the hemmed end of the ribbon – right over the hem. 
  7. The opposite half of the snap should be 3” above the first half.

    NOTE: If you are brand new to inserting snaps, we have a great snap setting tutorial that reviews all the basics. In addition, Dritz® has a YouTube Video on the topic using these exact pliers. 

Add the leather thong to the zipper pull

  1. As a finishing touch, insert the thin leather thong through the zipper pull. To do this, fold the thong in half and push the loop through the open end of the zipper pull, then feed the ends of the thong through the loop and cinch. This is just like how you’d attach a gift or price tag.
  2. Trim the ends so they look good to you. Our tails were trimmed down to approximately 2”.
  3. The snap forms a loop through the organizer’s D-Ring and the Swivel Clip can be attached to the bag, briefcase, tote, etc. into which the organizer will be placed.

We received compensation from Dritz® for this project, and some of the materials featured here or used in this project were provided free of charge by Dritz®.  All opinions are our own.

Contributors

Project Design: Alicia Thommas
Sample Creation and Instructional Outline: Debbie Guild

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Comments (10)

Kris VanAllen said:
Kris VanAllen's picture

What a great, detailed tutorial! What marking pen is the blue one you used on the rip-stop lining?

anne.adams said:
anne.adams's picture

@Kris VanAllen: Thanks for the kind words about this tutorial :) I'm sorry, but I'm unsure anymore what marking pen was used on the rip stop used this project. 

priya dey said:
priya dey's picture

Thanks for the lovely post. I am surely going to use the right product and the right tools for my business.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@priya dey - You're welcome. The right tools can make all the difference!

Julie-Anne said:
Julie-Anne's picture

How much do you estimate the cost of materials to be?

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Julie-Ann -- so sorry, but there are really too many variables in where you shop and what fabric/notions choices you'd make for us to give an estimate. However, we do include links to a variety of where to buy options for most of the materials so you can do some estimating based on that. 

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Linda -- you bet. This info is listed above at the end of the introduction. Here it is again: Our organizer finishes at approximately 13½” wide x 8½” high with an approximate 11” detachable swivel hook leash. This is a bit smaller than many of the commercial organizers so it is more likely to fit into a wide variety of bags and totes, however the center pocket is still big enough to accomodate most digital tablets.

DebS said:
DebS's picture

Wow! Love this! I have a smaller purse organizer that I just find invaluable. This one is a bit larger and is perfect for my larger handbags. I can't wait to make this project. Thank you Sew4Home!

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Deb - Thanks so much! This is a great size for many of the large-ish bags and totes. 

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