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Stylish Baby Nursery: Crib Bumpers in Two Cool Fabs

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Padded bumper pads for your crib are a nursery must have. Not only are they beautifully decorative, they keep your little darlin' from bonking her pretty little head. We chose a strong, graphic pattern for the inside of the bumpers, because the baby experts say that's what babies love to look at.

These instructions generally follow the instructions that come with the Fairfield Baby Bumper pads recommended below. For more information and where to buy visit poly-fil.com.

Our sample was made for a baby girl's nursery, using the stunning Patty Young Andalucia collection. For information on where to buy, read Stylish Baby Nursery: Designing Bold Colors & Patterns. This article also includes suggestions for creating an alternate fabric palette that would work well for a boy's nursery.

Sewing Tools You Need

Fabric and Other Supplies

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  • Fairfield NU Foam® Baby Bumper Pads - package of six measuring 10" x 26" x 1"
  • Fabric for inside of six crib bumpers: 2 yards of 45” wide fabric: we used Patty Young's Andalucia in Petal Jester.
  • Fabric for outside of six crib bumpers: 2 yards of 45" wide fabric: we used Patty Young's Andalucia in Petal Flora
  • Fabric for piping around bumpers AND corner ties: 1½ yards of 45” wide fabric: we used Patty Young's Andalucia in Fire Tiny Dots
  • 6 yards 3/8" diameter cotton cording
  • All-purpose thread in colors to match fabrics
  • Iron and Ironing board
  • See through ruler
  • Fabric marking pen or chalk pencil
  • Scissors or rotary cutter and mat
  • Straight pins
  • Iron and ironing board
  • Corner template (see download below)
  • 5" square piece of cardboard or template plastic for template (check your local craft store for stencil material)

Getting Started

Cut your fabric and trims

  1. Download the corner curve template and trace it onto a piece of cardboard or template plastic. Cut out.
  2. Cut six 27" x 11¾" pieces of fabric from both the Petal Jester and the Petal Flora (six pieces from each fabric). (Note: To make this amount of fabric sufficient, cut 11¾" pieces along the 45" edge of the fabric.)
  3. Using the template you made, mark a rounded edge on each corner of each 27" x 11¾" piece of fabric. Cut the rounded corners. Using the original template pattern (the paper), transfer the markings (the dots) onto your fabric using the fabric marking pen. I like to make a tiny hole with a pin right in the middle of the dot, then I line up my pattern on my fabric and make a mark with my pen through that hole.
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  4. For the ties, cut twenty-four 15½" x 2½" pieces from Fire Tiny Dots.
  5. Cut six 30" lengths from cording.
  6. Cut six 2¼" wide bias strips according to the instructions below. Each will need to be about 30" long.

Cut your bias strips

  1. On your cutting surface, lay your fabric out flat, right side up, with the selvage running along one side.
    Diagram
  2. The selvage is the woven edge of your fabric where it was originally attached to the loom. The fabric's pattern does not continue onto the selvage, but there is likely to be some information printed there that identifies the manufacturer or designer.
  3. Fold the fabric back diagonally so a straight edge is parallel to the selvage.
  4. Press the fold and use this crease as a guide to mark your parallel lines.
  5. Use a straight edge to make continuous parallel likes 2¼" apart.
    Diagram
  6. Cut along these lines with good, sharp scissors or a rotary cutter and straight edge.

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

Join bias strips

  1. You may need to join two strips to make one that is the necessary 30" long. To do this, take two of your strips and place them right sides together at right angels to each other.
  2. Stitch straight across.
    Diagram
  3. Lay flat, press the seam open and trim off the overlapping edges.
    Diagram
  4. Repeat until you have one long fabric strip.

Insert the cord

  1. Place one 30" bias strip right side down on a large flat surface.
  2. Lay a 30" length of cord in the center.
  3. Fold the fabric over the cord, keeping the cord centered and matching the raw edges of the fabric.
    Diagram
  4. Pin to hold in place.
  5. Carefully move to your sewing machine and adjust the piping so the raw edges line up on your seam allowance marking and cord pokes out to the left of your foot.
    Diagram
  6. Using the Zipper Foot, stitch slowly staying close to the cord and keeping your seam allowance consistent. Remember to remove your pins as you go so you don't sew over them.
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Stitch cording to bumper fabric

  1. Pin cording to the right side of a 27" x 11¾" piece of Petal Flora fabric. Using the dots you made with the template, start pinning the cording at the large dot in the center of left curved edge, stretching along the 27" straight side, and ending in the center of the curved edge at the large dot on the right side. Be sure to match the raw edges of the piping insertion fabric and the base fabric. Your cording should be centered between the dots.
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  2. Stitch in place using the zipper foot. You are stitching around a curve so you'll need to gently ease the fabric, which means it might ripple slightly. That's okay.
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  3. Repeat to add cording in this same manner to all six 27" x 11¾" Petal Flora pieces.

Make the ties

  1. With right sides together, fold a 15½" x 2½" Fire Tiny Dots fabric strip in half lengthwise.
  2. Stitch ¼" in from the edge along the long edge and across one end. Stop with your needle down at the corner, lift your presser foot, and pivot 90˚ to make a nice clean angle.
    Diagram
  3. Trim the corners, being careful not to clip into your seam.
    Diagram
  4. Press the long seam open.
  5. Turn the strip right side out. You've made a fairly narrow little tube, so you'll need a little help turning it. My favorite way is to use a large safety pin. Attach the safety pin to the seamed end and make sure the pin is securely closed. Then, pushing the pin backwards, wiggle it in on itself. It will take just a second to get this going, then you can keep wiggling the pin backwards until it comes out the other end. It's just like a snake shedding its skin, but not as creepy. Finally, slip a small knitting needle or other slim, dull pointy object up inside the tube and poke out the corners so they are nice and sharp. Janome machines come with a cool little lint brush, the other end of which is perfect for this task.
  6. Press the tie so the seam runs nice and straight along one long edge. We can leave other short edge unsewn, because this will not be seen – it will be sewn into the bumper.
  7. Repeat to finish all twenty-four ties in the same manner.

Finish the bumpers

  1. Pin a tie to the side of a Petal Flora piece, with the right side of the fabric facing up. Use the template to determine where to put them - you will pin them just below the small dot on the upper corners and just above the small dot on the lower corners. Pin them so the unfinished edge is matched along the edge of the Petal Flora Fabric.
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  2. Stitch the ties in place.
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  3. Repeat on all six pieces of Petal Flora.
  4. With right sides together, and ties and cording on the inside, pin a Petal Jester piece to a Petal Flora piece. It's very important that you make sure your ties are all facing in and free of the seams.
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  5. Stitch along THREE sides using the zipper foot. On the top edge, stitch slowly and as close to the cording as possible. On the edges without cording stitch using a standard ½" seam. You may change to a regular foot if you are more comfortable sewing with this on these edges. Leave one short edge open for turning and inserting the bumper pads.
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  6. Turn the cover right side out so the cording and ties pop out... ta-da!
  7. Insert bumper pads into the cover.
    NOTE: It will help give you a nice snug fit if you use the corner template to round the corners of the foam just as you did with the fabric panels.
  8. Turn under the seam allowance so your seam edges are flush to one another, and slip stitch the opening closed.
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Hints and Tips

You may find it easier to insert the bumper pads if you place them in a plastic bag before doing so. This will allow them to slip more easily into the covers. Be sure to do this so that the bag can be removed after the pads are in the covers.

Contributors
Project Design: Alicia Thommas
Sample Creation: Aimee McGaffey
Instructional Editing: Alison Newman

Other machines suitable for this project include the Pfaff Select 4.0 and the Bernina Bernette 92c.


Results From Our Readers

Submitted by Rachel in Idaho
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Submitted by Veronica in Hayden, AL
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Comments (189)

Grandma Susan said:
Grandma Susan's picture

I'm a Grandma preparing my shopping list for supplies to sew these bumpers for my daughter in law.  I mentioned that I made them for my babies years ago. She wants me to make them, and has told my son whom is serving in Afghanistan that as well.  Pressure!   I do confess, the fabric choices now are amazing!  A far cry from the chambrey blue calico of the 80's.  I will post the requested Zebra print pads upon completion!  Wish me luck

S. Smith said:
S. Smith's picture

I have one question: How does the front part of the crib go up and down with two of the bumpers meeting and tying at the middle of the slats. When my girls were babies (over 20 years ago), bumper pads were straight across.

I wrote the question as best as I could but it might still be confusing. Sorry.

Anonymous said:
Anonymous's picture

The side rails of the crib, no longer go up and down.  Regulations now require that the side remain fixed in place so the babies do not get their head stuck, if the side were to slide down unexpectedly.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@ S. Smith - the other commentor is correct, the cribs with the moveable sides aren't readily available. In addition, bumpers are traditionally used with the mattress in the highest position - when it is the easiest to simply lift the baby out of the crib. Most of the time it is recommended that bumpers be removed when the babies become more mobile (and larger, therefore, requiring the mattress be moved lower) so they are not used for climbing or pulling.

S. Smith said:
S. Smith's picture

Thanks everyone. I feel so old. I didn't even know that the crib sides no longer went up and down LOL. That solves my problem with worrying about that. If the concern is that babies can get stuck, then these types of bumpers would be better than the ones I used with my daughters because they are not one solid piece going all the way across. I got the pads in the mail today. These are very sturdy. I think everything will be fine with the baby until she is old enough to begin chewing, which is when I took my daughters' pads out.

Grandma Susan said:
Grandma Susan's picture

In June 2011 drop side cribs were declared unsafe. (all my children survived!).  I believe the additional sections allow for ties to keep the pads from collapsing on the baby.

Anonymous said:
Anonymous's picture

Ok this may sound dumb but I am assmbling the bumper sections and ties now and if I'm reading this right each section is seperate and only attached by the ties is that correct? I made a bumper before and simply attaced each section so that all 6 sections were attached but there were also the ties to attach to the crib would I be reading the instructions wrong or in this tutorial would the ties be the only thing attaching the  sections?

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

Yes, each section is separate and the ties are used both to tie the sections together and tie them to the crib.

NancyCM said:
NancyCM's picture

I have a question regarding the amount of fabric needed if we choose a pattern that has a design theme that runs horizontally meaning it would fit perfectly in the bumper sections and run perpendicular to the crib slats - just like the bumpers.  Your directions are very clear and easy to understand but this reference "cut 11¾" pieces along the 45" edge of the fabric" -  has me questioning how much fabric to purchase.  Does this mean that when the fabric is layed out to be cut that the six sections for the inside and outside pieces would be cut perpendicular to the selvage or parallel to the selvage?  We are purchasing fabric online so I cannot physically see it to ensure that we will have enough.

Thanks!

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@ NancyCM -- cutting the panels parallel to the selvedge gives you the most flexibility, however, you can also cut the perpendicular to the selvedge to accomodate a directional print, but you have less than 2" of leeway - you'd have to cut one right on top of the other and be super exact. If that is what you feel you'll need to do for your print, you should probably try to get 1/8 to 1/4 yard extra.

Emily Morris said:
Emily Morris's picture

Someone may have already asked this, but I didn't see it. Once you turn the ties right side out, how do you get the safety pin out??? I can't get to mine. :( Did I do it wrong?

JulieG said:
JulieG's picture

I had trouble with the safety pin too, so I ended up turning mine right-side-out using the handle of a long thin wooden spoon...... I just pushed the tie onto the handle and pulled it right side out. It maybe took 10 seconds per tie, and then I used a knitting needle to make the corners nice. Much easier for me than the safety pin!

Megan Shears said:
Megan Shears's picture

Does the batting inside the bumper pads turn when washing them since there is no stitch to hold them in place? 

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@ Megan Shears - the bumpers are designed so the pads are a very snug fit inside - so there really shouldn't be any twisting in the laundry. As with all pillow type products, you wouldn't want to wash them on ultra-high spin cycle.

Megan Shears said:
Megan Shears's picture

I am probably just over thinking this too much, but I have cut and now sewn the piping. I am pinning it to the other fabric and it is much longer than where the directions say it should be. The directions say it should lie between the two large dots and itgoes wellthat that. Does it matter if it does go past? Should I trim them to fit between the dots? 

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@ Megan Shears - the side of the fabric should be 27" and your length of cording should be 30" - so it may extend a little bit past the dots, but it shouldn't be a lot. 30" is just enough to go along the top with about 1-1/2" to round the corner on each side. Make sure your sizes are right. And, yes, you can trim your cording if need be. 

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture
@ ThisSassySalmon - We don't usually include a "length of time to finish" estimate unless the project is a super fast and easy one. There are so many variables in skill level and with machine features that can make things go more slowly or more quickly. If you are just beginning, you can certainly tackle this project. The hardest parts are the piping and the ties. For the piping - go slowly, be patient and use a zipper foot. For the ties, check out our tip about how to use hemostats to turn the small tubes -- super slick and you can find hemostats on Amazon or elsewhere for less than $10. You could finish one set within a day, certainly a weekend with breaks for other distractions. So yes, you have time smilies/cheesy.gif. Congratulations and have fun! Here's the link for the tube turning tip:
http://sew4home.com/tips-resources/sewing-tips-tricks/662-quick-tip-tiny...
ThisSassySalmon said:
ThisSassySalmon's picture
Question... Approximately how long does this take to make?? We are expecting twins late/summer or early/fall and I'd love to tackle this project (as well as your crib sheet and crib skirt). Of course... I'll be doing two of each so is it a realistic expectation that I could conquer this in two months time? I'm a beginner sewer - I make burp cloths, nursing covers, pillows, curtains, etc. Is this out of my league?
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture
@ Victoria M. - your math on the ties is correct - you can fit two side by side across the 45" width and so need 30" in depth cutting one right on top of the other. If you have the recommended 1-1/2 yards of fabric for the bias strips and ties, that means you have 45" x 54" to start with. You can certainly cut the ties first, that would probably be the easiest. So then you'd have 45" x 24" to work with for your strips, which should be enough. As mentioned above, you will need to seam strips together to finish with six 30" lengths. If you're worried about all the cutting and seaming, you could certainly get 1/4 to 1/2 a yard extra to make it easier. Finally regarding selvedge, it runs perpendicular to the width - so in our story problem above, that means the 54" sides... or after you're done cutting ties, the 24" sides. Even if there's no printing, you can usually see a difference in the weave and sometimes some tiny holes at these outside edges.
Victoria M. said:
Victoria M.'s picture
This might be a dumb question, but do you cut the ties out of the fabric before you cut the bias strips? If so, how do you cut the fabric so that there's enough for the bias strips? Unless I did my calculations wrong, it looks like the strips would use a total of 30" by 31" of the fabric, does that leave enough for the bias strips?? I'm planning to keep the corners square, so do I need more/less piping to do this?

Also, my fabric is a solid color, so I'm having a hard time deciphering the selvage edge (there's nothing printed on any of the edges). I assume it's one of the 45" sides?
Bailey D said:
Bailey D's picture
Great tutorial!!! Thank you, thank you. This is exactly what I have been looking for. My crib bumper turned out amazing.
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture
@ Gee Clarkesville Ga - In the time it's taken me to response, you've probably already finished and the grandbaby has probably come!! If not, I think you could make it all work, but your bumpers will turn out a bit smaller. If you are able to use the NuForm, I'd really recommend it; it's the best option for the safest type of bumpers. You'd just have to cut down the pads a bit to bit -- probably about an inch all around to fit your covers (if you use a 1/2" seam allowance). It's easy to cut.

You can order the pads online if getting to a store in an issue. Even Amazon carries them: http://www.amazon.com/Poly-Fil...B003GGWEL8

We also just posted a new nursery, which features a similar set of bumpers with all around jumbo piping. Cute, cute, cute:

http://sew4home.com/projects/bed-linens/905-citron-a-gray-nursery-5

Have fun!
alicia.thommas said:
alicia.thommas's picture
Nadia, your bumpers really turned out beautifully! Lovely fabric choices. Thanks so much for sharing.
Nadia said:
Nadia's picture
I am VERY new to sewing and there were a few( ok, who am I kiding? A LOT!) bumps along the road but here is the finished product!!!! THANK YOU!!!!

smilies/grin.gif
Gee Clarkesville Ga said:
Gee  Clarkesville Ga's picture
I love these bumper pads!!! I wish I had found your site before I cut mine out. I'm going to try to modify the ones I've cut already. They are 54" x 11" before sewing. I don't have the seam allowance but if I put a larger piping and have it go all the way aroung the pad that could make up for the length, don't you think? I'm already using to different fabric patterns and I have a third fabric left over from a matching quilt cover the piping. I'm incorporating machine embroidery into both the quilt and bumper pad. The crib skirt is already finish. I was losing my excitement over the whole set because I was having a hard time picturing the pads. Now I can't wait to start putting it together. I was going to use quilt batting, I hadn't heard of the Fairfield pads. I live in the sticks and a trip to the fabric store (besides Walmart) is pretty much a whole day trip. Awh too bad I have to actual go to the store and FEEL the fabric. smilies/wink.gif lol The baby could come any day now. Yep I'm one of those who's sewing at midnight on Christmas Eve. As soon as I can get pictures of the finished crib set I'll post. This is a wonderful site Liz! Thank you for giving us a place to gather and share.
Veronica I adore the use of the corduroy. I'll have to plan on that for the next grandchild smilies/grin.gif
alicia.thommas said:
alicia.thommas's picture
Sarah M. Each individual pad has four ties, two on each side (one top, one bottom). Those tie together with the bumper pad next to it, and around a crib slat. The photo just above the heading "Hints and Tips" shows the individual ties clearly. The photo at the very top of the article does show the top and bottom ties. Some of the user photos also show the ties quite well.
Sarah M said:
Sarah M's picture
So where each pad intersects, it seems like there would be two sets of ties, but I only see one in the picture. How does that work?
Robert said:
Robert's picture
@Liz: yeah, i'll just try to make it work. Lining up the straight edges makes the curve of the template hang over the fabric, so i can't use it, but i see what you mean. Thanks!
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture
@ Richard - I think you are too worried about perfection... something I try to avoid :-)). Print out the template at 100% and align it just like you see in the picture. Align the \"straight\" sides with the raw edges of the fabric as close as you can and then round the corner. If you feel more comfortable with it, you could even use the rounded edge of a salad plate to make the curve. You just want to round the corners slightly so your piping will curve nicely.
flippedcracker said:
@Liz: http://img845.imageshack.us/im...e0001u.jpg

I'm getting stumped at the part circled in red. i put a line where the fabric would line up, but the curve goes out past that. i figured i could just make the curve how i think it's supposed to be, but i wanted to make sure there wasn't a specific reason as to why the template was like that.
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture
@ Robert --I'm a little bit stumped where you are going wrong on the template. A couple things to try: look at the first picture in our Getting Started section. Can you make your template and fabric look just like ours? Also, as we always mention, it's really important that you print out any template or pattern we provide at 100% -- do not let your printer shrink it to fit in any way. Some printers do that by default, so be sure you check your print window and un-check anything like "shrink to fit" or "fit page" -- it could be that the template printed too small and so isn't fitting right in the corner. Again, you should be able to line it up just like our photo. Best of luck!
flippedcracker said:
I'm trying to make these bumpers, but i'm stumped on cutting the curve with the template. I'm new to sewing, so i'm probably just missing something that someone with experience would already know. The template you have for download has the curve part sticking out past the straight part on the lower half of the curve. If i line up the straight parts, the curve sticks out past the fabric to be cut. if i line up the curve to the edge of the fabric, there's extra fabric that would be leftover after the cut on the straight part. The top part of the template seems fine, but i can't figure out the lower part. If i'm not explaining it well, i can add a picture to help.

I've read through all the comments and see many people that have completed these, so i feel kinda dumb for asking, but can anyone help me with it? Thanks.
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture
@ Maggie -- the final design is up to you, but you should know that there are safety concerns regarding "fluffy" pillows of any kind in cribs. We made sure our bumpers followed the best-practices guidelines for construction, length and number of ties used to secure the bumpers, and the use of flat and dense padding rather than puffy batting.
Maggie in Charleston, SC said:
Maggie in Charleston, SC's picture
Hi...I love your tutorial! I am going to attempt to make this for my daughter. She likes a plumper style bumper so I was wondering if it would work to use polyfil instead of the pads? Thanks, Maggie
JessykaKahlan said:
JessykaKahlan's picture
sorry meant to write mm not cms. ive found some that is 2mm...would that be suitable??
JessykaKahlan said:
JessykaKahlan's picture
Hi. im just wondering what is the width of cording if done in cms? ive tried googling it but cant seem to find anything lol
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture
@lezlie - how long anything takes really depends on your skill level, so I rarely make promises on that one. I'd give yourself a couple days as the cutting and making the piping takes some time... a few hours of prep, then assemble on day two.
Lezlie said:
Lezlie's picture
Awesome tutorial! Very detailed and thorough. About how long does it take to complete?
alstevenson said:
alstevenson's picture
Liz, you answered my confusing question great. Thank you for the help. I am very excited to get the bumpers finished.
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture
@ alstevenson -- well, you're right, I'm a wee bit confused by the question, but let me take a stab at it. I think it will help if you look closely at the photographs - especially the 2nd photo under "Stitch cording to bumper fabric" and the 1st photo under "finish bumpers". You do not need to stitch the ends of the cording. As the directions outline, center your piping between the two dots (the dots from the pattern template) and stitch from dot to dot. Leave the ends free. You can even trim them to exactly match the curve of the bumper fabric -- which is what you see in that second photo I mentioned above. When you stitch the front and back together, the end of the cording tapers into and disappears within the seam - like you see in the last photo of the instructions. Hope that helps.
alstevenson said:
alstevenson's picture
Hi Liz. I am attempting to sew the crib bumpers at this time. I am very new to sewing and am trying to learn from information online and my mother-in-law. I have a question about sewing the cording onto the first piece of bumper fabric. Do you sew over the cording on the ends so that the ends are not exposed, or do you close in the cording by sewing the cording fabric on each end. This may be a confusing question. I hope it is clear enough
Liz Johnson, Editor, Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson, Editor, Sew4Home's picture
@ Karin Marie Smith, The length of the finished ruffles would be the same as the piping, assuming you want to just switch out the one for the other. So, six 30" ruffle strips. If you are asking about the amount of flat fabric to start with, the rule of thumb for ruffles is to start with a strip that is 2.5 times the length of your finished piece. So, in our example, that would be a 75" strip ruffled down to a finished 30" piece. Hope that helps. Have fun.
Karin Marie Smith said:
Karin Marie Smith's picture
I love this! Hopefully will be starting mines soon! Just have to figure out the fabric & so on! If you added ruffles instead of cording how much would you need? This tutorial is going to help me out tons! Thanks for posting! :]
Sarah Salgado said:
Sarah Salgado's picture
Thank you SO much for this tutorial! It was so easy to follow, and I am thrilled with the results!! Couldn't figure out how to upload a picture though...
Liz Johnson, Editor, Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson, Editor, Sew4Home's picture
Hi merz77 these bumpers finish at apx. 26" x 10-3/4" x 1". Pretty much exactly the size of the foam itself.
Merz77 said:
Merz77's picture
Are all the pads made with this tutorial 27" x 11¾" in the end? I have a hand made cradle that I'm trying to make pads for and just need to know the finished product dimensions. Thank you!!

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