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Overall Apron with Adjustable Waist, Rivets & More: Dritz Hardware

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I’ve always loved overalls. When my kids were small, they were my rough-and-tumble choice for play clothes. But, they’re a personal favorite as well because they have such a comfy, loose fit. We often look to clothing items as initial inspiration for our apron projects, and knowing that Dritz® had a great set of Overall Buckles and Buttons (a no-sew hardware product) made the choice clear. With its classic fabric combination and the tough Dritz® hardware, this apron has an industrial-strength look and feel serious cooks will love. 

In addition to the Overall Buckles and Buttons, we also used Dritz® Double Cap Rivets and a set of adjusting hardware for the waist closure, which is designed to sit at the natural waistline. All the hardware is in a classic nickel finish.

There’s a clever center seam in the apron’s skirt that ends with a bottom kick vent. And although the skirt is just one layer of ticking, there are no exposed raw edges. We show you the easy steps for a professional finish front and back.

Our thanks to Dritz® for sponsoring this apron project. They always have lots of fun ideas and products to make your sewing easier and more creative. To find out about it all, we invite you to visit their website or blog; or follow them on Pinterest, Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube

We usually recommend pre-washing your fabric, but since aprons need to stand up to frequent laundering, it's even more important here. Ticking tends to be quite stiff right off the bolt, so pre-washing also helps it soften up so it’s easier to work with, but fair warning… it will wrinkle, as will the linen blend. Press both fabrics prior to cutting out your panels. For more about pre-washing, check out our full tutorial.

Ticking and linen blends often come in wider widths. As you’ll see below in our Supplies list, our fabric choices were 54” and 52” wide respectively. The cuts shown are based on these wide widths. If you choose a narrower fabric, you’ll need to purchase additional fabric. Check out our Yardage Conversion Cheat Card for help, or do what we often do: draw out your cuts on a piece of paper on which you’ve drawn a rectangle the width of your chosen fabric(s); keep extending the length axis until you have enough yardage to capture all the required cuts.

In the name, we call it an “adjustable” apron. This is because the riveted neck strap can be shortened or lengthened with a pair of Dritz® Overall Buckles, and the clever waistband incorporates a Dritz® Swivel Hook, D-Ring, and Slide Adjuster to tighten or loosen the fit.

As with store-bought aprons, our design is meant to be one-size-fits-all. However, we realize you may still wish to make yours smaller or larger. As a reference, the skirt of this apron finishes approximately 27" wide x 20½” high. The bib is approximately 9½” wide across the top x 9½” high, making the total length of the apron, top to bottom, 30”. The neck loop is 30" long and is adjustable with the Overall Buckles. The base of the bib sits at waist level and is 27” across to match the width of the skirt; the waist hook and ring strap is further adjustable from 5½” to 9½”.

You can find Dritz® notions and hardware at fine in-store and online retailers everywhere

Sewing Tools You Need

Fabric and Other Supplies

Getting Started and Pattern Download

  1. Download and print the TWO pattern pieces required. These two pieces have been bundled into one PDF file to make the download easier.
    IMPORTANT: This pattern download consists of TWO 8½" x 11" sheets. You must print the PDF file at 100%. DO NOT SCALE to fit the page. There is a guide rule on each sheet to confirm your printout it to scale.
  2. Cut out the pattern pieces along the solid lines. Butt together the two cutaway pieces at the arrows as indicated. Do not overlap. Tape together to form the complete cutaway pattern.
  3. From the fabric for the apron bib (the black linen blend in our sample), cut the following:
    ONE 3½” x 31” strip for the neck strap
    ONE 3” x 13” strip for the Slide Adjuster waist strap
    ONE 2” x 2” square for the Swivel Hook loop
    ONE 7” x 11” rectangle for the bib pocket
    TWO 28" x 10½" rectangles for the main front and lining panels
    NOTE: Because this fabric is a solid, we cut these main panels vertically for the best use of space.
  4. Layer the two main rectangles right sides together.
  5. Pin the assembled armhole cutaway pattern in the upper right corner of the layered panels, aligning the top and side edge of the pattern with the top and side raw edges of the fabric.
  6. Cut along the inner curved line through both layers.
  7. Flip over the pattern and repeat to cut away the upper left corner through both layers.
  8. Discard the pieces you cut away or add them to your scrap stash.
  9. From the fabric for the apron skirt (the ticking in our sample), cut the following:
    ONE 29¼” wide x 21½” high rectangle for the apron skirt
    ONE 15½” wide x 8½" high for the skirt pocket
    NOTE: With the ticking, we recommend using your scissors rather than a rotary cutter so you can fussy cut right along a stripe in order to keep the ticking straight and true on all sides.
  10. Fold the panel in half to find the exact vertical center.
  11. Clip into the fold to mark this center line.
  12. Sub-cut vertically along the exact center to create two matching panels.

  13. From the lightweight interfacing, cut the following:
    TWO 28" x 10½" rectangles for the bib front and lining panels, cutting away the outer curves just as you did above for the bib fabric

    ONE 1¼” x 30” strip for the neck strap
    ONE 6” x 5” rectangle for the bib pocket

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

Skirt center seam and outer perimeter hem

  1. Place the two skirt panels right sides together. All raw edges should be flush. Pin along the center cut line.
  2. Make a mark 5½” up from the bottom raw edges of the panels. This is where your center seam will stop to create the bottom riveted vent.
  3. Using a ⅝” seam allowance, stitch together the center panels. Remember to stop at lock your seam at the marked bottom point.
  4. Press the seam allowance open and flat.
  5. Make sure to continue pressing along the raw edges of the vent – all the way down to the bottom edge of the fabric panels.
  6. Tuck back the raw edge along each side of the seam allowance ¼”. Press well.
  7. As above, this tuck-and-press goes the length of the panel from the top of the seam to the bottom of the vent.
  8. Thread the machine with thread to best match the ticking in the top and bobbin. Slightly lengthen the stitch.
  9. Flip over the main panel and topstitch ⅛” to either side of the seam. This holds the tuck in place, giving you a clean finish on the back of the skirt.
  10. Remember, once again, to stitch from the top all the way down to the bottom in order to finish the edges of the vent to exactly match the seam.
  11. Finish both skirt side edges and the bottom edges with a narrow, ¼” double-turn hem. The top edge remains raw.
  12. To do this, first fold in the each raw edge ¼” and press well.
  13. Then fold an additional ¼”, concealing the raw edge within the fold, and press again.
  14. The machine should still be threaded with thread to best match the ticking in the top and bobbin and the stitch should still be slightly lengthened.
  15. Topstitch close to the inner fold to secure, pivoting at all corners.
  16. The outer corners of the skirt and the inner bottom corners of the vent opening can be a simple square overlap.

Create and place the skirt pocket

  1. Find the skirt pocket panel. The ticking is quite sturdy so no interfacing or lining is required.
  2. Fold back all four raw edges ¼” and press well.
  3. Along the top edge only, fold down an additional 1” and press again.
  4. Topstitch to secure, staying close to the inner fold. This forms the pocket’s wider top hem.
  5. Place the skirt panel right side up and flat on your work surface.
  6. Fold the pocket in half to find the exact center. Place a pin at this point.
  7. Align the pocket’s center pin point with the center seam of the skirt panel. The pocket top should sit 1½” down from the top raw edge of the skirt panel.
  8. Pin the pocket in place along both sides and across the bottom.
  9. Topstitch the pocket in place along both sides and across the bottom, pivoting at each corner.
  10. Stitch vertically along the center line through all layers, dividing the wide pocket into two equal compartments.
  11. With all topstitching, if possible, use a lock stitch to start and end your seams for the cleanest finish. If this feature is not available on your machine, leave the thread tails long and knot at the back to secure.

Add rivets to the vent and skirt pocket

  1. The vent rivet goes at the bottom of the center seam – the top of the vent.
  2. Collect the Dritz® Double Cap Rivets and the Dritz® Setting Tools.
  3. First cut the hole with the cutting tool.
  4. Set the back cap of the rivet into position through the hole from back to front. As mentioned above, you should use a very hard surface to hammer against for the best seal. We like to use a small block of granite.
  5. Place the front cap onto the stud of the back cap, and, using the setting anvil, hammer to seal.
  6. Repeat to add three additional rivets along the top of the pocket: one at each corner and one at the top of the center dividing seam.

    NOTE: Riveting is easier than you might think (especially with the Dritz® tools), and we’ve summarized the steps above. If you’re brand new, check out our Metal Rivets Tutorial.

Create the adjustable waist tie and loop

  1. Find the 3” x 13” strip for the Slide Adjuster waist strap. Fold back each 13” raw side edge and one 3” raw end ½” and press well. The opposite 3” end remains raw.
  2. Fold in half, wrong sides together, aligning the folded raw edges.
  3. Re-thread the machine with thread to best match the fabric in the top and bobbin. Keep a slightly lengthened stitch.
  4. Edgestitch along the long folded sides and across the one folded end.

  5. The strap should finish at 1”.
  6. Find the Dritz® Slide Adjuster and the Dritz® 1” D-Ring.
  7. Slip the finished end of the strap through the center bar of the Slide Adjuster. Pull it back on itself about 1”. Stitch across to secure the end in place.
  8. Bring the free raw end of the strap through the D-Ring then thread it up and over the center ring of the Slide Adjuster – on top of the existing sewn loop. Pull the free end all the way through.

    NOTE: If you are brand new to this technique, our friends at Dritz® also sponsored a complete, step-by-step tutorial on how to create an adjustable strap.
  9. Find the 2” x 2” square for the Swivel Hook loop.
  10. Fold back two sides ½” so they meet in the middle and press well.
  11. Fold in half and edgestitch along the folded sides. The ends remain raw.
  12. Find the Dritz® Swivel Hook. Slip the loop through the Hook, bringing it through so the raw ends of the loop are flush. Pin the ends together.
  13. Set aside the Swivel Hook tab and the Slide Adjuster strap.

Create the bib

  1. Following manufacturer's instructions, fuse an interfacing panel to the wrong side of the bib front and the bib lining panels.
  2. Find the 7” x 11” bib pocket panel. Fold it in half, wrong sides together, so it is now 7” x 5½”. Press to set a center crease line. Unfold wrong side up so the crease line is visible. Find the 6” x 5” interfacing panel. Place it on one half of the pocket panel, aligning it with the center crease line so there is ½” of fabric extending beyond the interfacing along the other three sides. Following manufacturer's instructions, fuse in place.
  3. Fold the pocket in half again, this time right sides together
  4. Pin along both sides and across the bottom, leaving a 3" opening along the bottom for turning. 
  5. Re-set the stitch length to normal.
  6. Using a ½" seam allowance, stitch along both sides and across the bottom, pivoting at the corners and remembering to lock your seam at either side of the 3" opening. Clip the corners at a diagonal, being careful not to cut into your seam.
  7. Turn right side out through the opening.
  8. Use a long, blunt-end tool, such as a knitting needle, chopstick or point turner to gently push out the corners so they are nice and sharp.
  9. Press well, pressing in the raw edges of the opening so they are flush with the sewn seam. 
  10. Find one of the interfaced bib panels. Place it right side up and flat on your work surface. Place the pocket on the bib panel so it is centered side to side and so the bottom of the pocket (the seamed edge with the opening) is 2½” up from the bottom raw edge of the bib panel.
  11. Re-set for a slightly lengthened stitch. Edgestitch the pocket in place along both sides and across the bottom, pivoting at the corners. This closes the opening used for turning.
  12. Add a rivet to the top corners of the pocket, following the same steps as above.
  13. Collect the Dritz® Double Cap Rivets and the Dritz® Setting Tools.
  14. Cut the hole with the cutting tool.
  15. Set the back cap of the rivet into position through the hole from back to front.
  16. Place the front cap onto the stud of the back cap, and, using the setting anvil, hammer to seal.
  17. Repeat to add a matching rivet in the opposite corner.
  18. Place the bib front, with its pocket in place, right side up and flat on your work surface.
  19. Find the Swivel Hook tab and the Slide Adjuster strap. Place the Swivel Hook tab on the left side of the bib, centering it within the short straight edge. The raw ends of the the tab should be flush with the raw edge of the bib. Pin in place.
  20. Place the Slide Adjuster strap at the right side of the bib. The strap should be right sides together with the bib, the raw end of the strap should be flush with the right raw edge of the bib, and that raw end should be centered within the short straight edge. Pin in place.
  21. Place the bib front and bib lining right sides together, aligning all the raw edges of both panels. Pin in place along the top, the curved side edges, and the short straight side edges. The bottom remains open.
  22. Make sure the Swivel Hook tab and the Slide Adjuster strap are flat and sandwiched between the layers.
  23. Re-set the stitch length to normal.
  24. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch along the top, the curved side edges, and the short straight side edges. Remember, the bottom remains open.
  25. Clip the upper corners and the side curves.
  26. Turn right side out through the open bottom.
  27. Smooth out the curves and gently push out the corners. As above, a long, blunt-end tool, such as a knitting needle, chopstick or point turner works well for this.
  28. Pull the Swivel Hook tab and the Slide Adjuster strap out into position to either side. Press flat.

Attach the bib to the skirt

  1. Fold up the bottom raw edge of the bib lining ½”. The bottom raw edge of the bib front remains un-folded. Press well.
  2. Find the apron skirt. Place the top raw edge of the skirt right sides together with the bottom front raw edge of the bib (the unfolded edge). Pin across.

    NOTE: Because the short straight side edges of the bib are already seamed, you can’t quite pin all the way out to either side. This is okay; simply pin as far as you can. The tiny un-seamed sections will be hidden within the lining and secured with the final edgestitching.
  3. Using a ½” seam allowance, stitch across. Remember, you are only stitching through the bib's front panel. Make sure the bib lining is pulled out of the way.
  4. Press the seam allowance up towards the top of the bib. Again, hold the lining out of the way.
  5. Bring the folded edge of the lining down into position, just covering the seam allowance. Pin in place all the way across.
  6. At each short straight side edge, tuck as needed for a clean finish. Each side hemmed edge of the skirt should be flush with each side seamed edge of the bib.
  7. Re-set for a slightly lengthened stitch.
  8. Edgestitch all around the outer perimeter of the bib, pivoting at all corners.
  9. Then stitch across the horizontal center line through all the layers. This final bit of edgestitching secures the lining in place.
  10. Add two rivets at each side of the bib to firmly secure the the Swivel Hook tab and the Slide Adjuster strap.
  11. Collect the Dritz® Double Cap Rivets and the Dritz® Setting Tools.
  12. The rivets are centered top to bottom and ⅝” apart. Mark appropriately.
  13. Then, insert both pairs of rivets, using the same method as described above.

Create the neck strap and attach the overall buckles and buttons

  1. Find the 3½” x 31” strip for the neck strap and the 1¼” x 30 interfacing strip.
  2. Fold the strip in half, wrong sides together, so it is now 1¾” x 31”. Press to set a center crease line. Unfold wrong side up so the crease line is visible. Place the interfacing on one half of the strip, aligning it with the center crease line so there is ½” of fabric extending beyond the interfacing along the other three sides. Following manufacturer's instructions, fuse in place.
  3. Fold back all four sides of the strip ½” and press well.
  4. Fold in half again, wrong sides together, aligning all the folded edges. You should now have a 1¼” width strip that is finished on all sides.
  5. You should still have a slightly lengthened stitch.
  6. Edgestitch along the folded edge and across both ends.
  7. Collect the Dritz® Double Cap Rivets and the Dritz® Setting Tools in order to add eleven rivets down the center of the strap.
  8. Use the drawing below to help you set up the rivet points.
  9. Cut a hole at each rivet point.
  10. And, using the same steps as for riveting above, set each Dritz® Double Cap Rivet into place along the strap.
  11. Find the Dritz® Overall Buckles and Buttons.
  12. Thread each finished strap end through one of the buckles.
  13. Find the finished apron. Mark for an Overall Button at each top corner of the bib. The Button should sit 1½” in from the finished side edge and 1” down from the finish top edge. Cut a small hole at each marked point.
  14. Insert the button stud through the hole from back to front.
  15. Place the button front over the stud. Gently push into position, then lightly hammer to secure.
    NOTE: Working with the Dritz® Overall Buckles and Buttons is very easy, but if you are brand new, check out the Dritz® video on YouTube for a full demonstration. 
  16. As shown in the sample photos above, as our finishing touch, we added a Dritz® Leather Label stamped with HANDMADE (because that's just what it is!), hand-stitching it to the top right of the bib pocket. 

We received compensation from Dritz® for this project, and some of the materials featured here or used in this project were provided free of charge by Dritz®.  All opinions are our own.

Contributors

Project Design: Alicia Thommas    
Sample Creation: Leah Wand

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Comments (7)

YlwBird said:
YlwBird's picture

I made this today.  Love the design.  I do believe the waist strap needs to be longer. I don't see it being viable for many people.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@YlwBird - So glad to hear you love our apron! We do base on designs on standard sizing we find at the retail level, but we also realize people may wish to increase or decrease the dimensions. As mentioned in the the intro, this particular apron is 27” across the main skirt panel at the waist with the waist hook and ring strap further adjustable from 5½” to 9½ for a final waist length from 32½” to 36½. 

Janet Szabo said:
Janet Szabo's picture

i can’t seem to find the measurement for the front ticking pocket. Can you help? Thanks.

anne.adams said:
anne.adams's picture

@Janet Szabo: Thanks for catching that -- please refresh your browser and you'll see that cut size with the ticking cuts now. Hope you love your finished apron!

Janet Szabo said:
Janet Szabo's picture

Perfect! Thanks so much. I can't wait to finish this and use it!

Kelly Dannemann said:
Kelly Dannemann's picture

Although you gals have made beautifil aprons in the past, this one by far is now my favorite. Will be making this one up fast and posting to facebook. THANK YOU!@@! Have a great Easter weekend.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@Kelly - Thank you so much! It’s a favorite of lots of people, including our own staff! We’d love to see a pix on FB of your finished apron ❤️