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Indygo Junction Easy-On Apron: A S4H Pattern Hack

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This project is a unique one for Sew4Home as we are using someone else’s pattern to create the final design. You might have heard the industry news this spring that Prym Consumer – the parent company of our sponsor, Dritz – acquired Amy Barickman’s Indygo Junction, allowing Prym to enter the market with clothing, apron, home décor, and craft patterns that naturally align with their existing options and tools. Dritz asked us to pick an Indygo Junction pattern to alter with our own Sew4Home Spin, a “pattern hack” if you will. Read on to see the changes we made and to learn how you could enter to win the original Indygo Junction pattern. We have three to give away! 

Prym will maintain over 100 Indygo Junction patterns in stock for shipping as well as offer nearly 200 digital downloads. For our pattern hack, we chose the Indygo Junction Easy-On Apron.

This pattern is a classic, one-size-fits-all shape. The body of the apron falls in loose gathers from an upper band. The front is a single panel and the back is comprised of two panels held in place with a simple bow. The Indygo Junction instructions take you through how to put it all together from single-layers of mid-weight fabric.

Our first update was to add a full lining, which not only makes the apron pretty from the inside out and adds little peeks of color from both sides, it also allowed us to use two lightweight quilting cottons without compromising any of the basic structure of how the apron fits and hangs.

We also created a new pocket pattern in order to use our lining fabric as an accent on the apron’s front. A pointed pocket flap rimmed in rick rack adds fun color and texture. As in the Indygo Junction original design, these new pockets are secured into the side seams.

Speaking of rick rack, in the photos above you can see this happy embellishment along the pockets as well as the arm openings and the straps. Using a lining lets you add this type of trim into the seams for a smooth finish all around.

Finally, we altered the shoulder straps to add snaps at the front. This makes the Easy-On Apron even easier. The construction doesn’t change much at all, but we do provide a pattern download with snap placement markings as well as full instructions on inserting the straps into the upper bands.

Our gorgeous fabric is courtesy of our friends at Fat Quarter Shop and we thank them so much for allowing us to browse their amazing selection of the best quilting cotton collections. What you might find interesting is that our two fabrics are from two different manufacturers, but you can see how beautifully they blend. Yes, you can cross collections! We chose Nature Walk from the Open Road collection by Bonnie Christine for Art Gallery Fabrics and Stripe in Pink from the Gazebo collection by Tanya Whelan for FreeSpirit Fabrics. But… we couldn’t stop there! Below are four other combinations we felt would be lovely for this apron project. 

Click on a swatch below for more detail. The four groupings show front fabric on the right and lining on the left.

    

    

This is an adorable apron, but what makes it even more cool is that the size and drape also makes it a super cute topper over leggings or skinny jeans. And thanks to the gathers and the high placement of the upper bands, it could even work as a maternity smock. So many uses!

How to enter to win an Indygo Junction Easy-On Apron pattern

Make the original design, follow our hacks, or create your own update! We have THREE copies of the Indygo Junction Easy-On Apron to give away to three lucky Sew4Home visitors.

Enter using the handy Rafflecopter form below.

We will draw THREE winners, who will each receive a printed patternUsing Rafflecopter, we will draw our winners at random from all entries as of midnight PT July 18, 2019.

No purchase is necessary to enter. Void where prohibited.

NOTE: This Giveaway is open to our US visitors as well as our International visitors.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Sewing Tools You Need


Fabric and Other Supplies

Getting Started and Pattern Add-Ons

  1. DOWNLOAD PATTERN: Download and print out our FOUR add-on pattern pieces (Pocket Part A, Pocket Part B, Strap Part A, and Strap Part B), which have been bundled into one PDF to make the download easier.
    IMPORTANT: Each of the three pages within this PDF is ONE 8½" x 11" sheet. You must print the PDF file at 100%. DO NOT SCALE to fit the page. There is a guide rule on each page so you can confirm your final printout is to scale.
  2. Cut out the two pieces that make up the Strap. Using the arrows printed on the pattern pieces, butt them together (do no overlap) and tape together to create the full-size pattern.
  3. Repeat to assemble the two pieces that make up the Pocket pattern.
  4. Collect all the pieces from the Indygo Junction pattern; you are using all the pieces except for the pocket and the strap.
  5. From the main front fabric (the floral in our sample), cut the following:
    Using the IJ pattern, cut ONE on the fold, for the front panel

    Using the IJ pattern, cut TWO for the back panels

    NOTE: You will see some “corner points” on the IJ pattern pieces. These are necessary when creating the apron from a single layer of fabric. Because we are fully lining our Apron Hack, you can trim away these points.

    Using the IJ pattern, cut TWO for the front top band
    Using the IJ pattern, cut TWO for the back top band
    Using the S4H add-on pattern, cut TWO for the straps
    Using the S4H add-on pattern, cut TWO for the pocket fronts
    NOTE: As always when working with patterns, make sure to take the time to transfer all markings from the paper pattern pieces to the fabric panels. In particular on this project, there is an important mark for placement on the front panel for the bottom corner of each pocket. You can clip into the edge of the fabric, as we did, or mark with a fabric pen or pencil.

  6. From the lining and accent fabric (the stripe in out sample), cut the following:
    Using the IJ pattern, cut ONE on the fold, for the front panel
    Using the IJ pattern, cut TWO for the back panels
    NOTE: In both cases, if using a stripe as we did, it’s important to fussy cut to insure your stripes are straight.

    Using the S4H add-on pattern, cut TWO for the pocket backs
    TWO 3” x 16” strips for the back ties; we cut with our stripes running vertically

  7. From the mid-weight interfacing, cut the following:
    Using the IJ pattern, cut ONE, on the seam line, for the front top band
    Using the IJ pattern, cut ONE, on the seam line, for the back top band
    Using the S4H add-on pattern, cut ONE, on the seam line. Then, slice this strip in half. You'll use one half for each strap.
  8. From the lightweight interfacing, using the S4H add-on pattern, cut FOUR on the seam line, for the pockets.
  9. The rick rack will be cut to fit during construction.

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

Create the pockets

  1. Collect all four pocket panels and the matching panels of lightweight interfacing. If you haven’t done it yet, don’t forget to transfer all pattern markings to the fabric panels. The fold line is especially important to keep track of for folding as well as for the rick rack placement.
  2. Center an interfacing panel on the wrong side of each fabric panel so there is ⅜” of fabric showing beyond the interfacing on all sides. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse in place.
  3. Flip over the lining pocket panels. Find the rick rack.
  4. Pin a length of rick rack along the upper edge of each pocket panel. The rick rack should sit about ” in from the raw edge of the fabric. Your seam allowance will be ” and you want this seam to go right down the middle of the ½" rick rack. Make a tiny fold at the point of pocket panel to pivot.
  5. Place each exterior pocket panel right sides together with each lining pocket panel, sandwiching the rick rack between the layers. Pin in place. Remember, the outer edge of each pocket is secured into the side seam of the apron. This outer edge should be left un-sewn.
  6. Using a ” seam allowance, stitch along the pocket top, inner side edge, and the bottom.
    NOTE: S4H traditionally uses a ½” seam allowance but this IJ apron pattern specifies a ” seam allowance and is what we used throughout.
  7. Clip the corners and press open the seam allowance.
  8. Turn each pocket right side out through the open side. Using a long, blunt tool, gently push out the corners and the point of the pocket flap so they are nice and sharp. A knitting needle, chopstick or point turner works well for this.
  9. Fold the pocket flap down into position, using the marked fold line on the original paper pattern. Pin the flap in place.
  10. Find the main exterior front panel. Place it right side up and flat on your work surface.
  11. Position a pocket right side up on each side edge of the apron panel.
  12. Remember those important pattern markings you transferred above? You can now use them to align the outer bottom corner of each pocket.
  13. The raw edge of the pocket should be flush with the raw edge of the fabric panel. Pin the pocket in place.
  14. Edgestitch along the inner side edge and…
  15. … across the bottom, pivoting at the corner. We prefer a slightly lengthened stitch for our edgestitching.
  16. We also stitched along the raw edge with a basting stitch length just to insure there was no shifting of the pocket throughout the remainder of the construction.

Add rick rack to the arm openings

  1. Find the exterior front panel, both exterior back panels, and the rick rack.
  2. Pin the rick rack along the arm openings of all three panels, which means you are applying four lengths of rick rack.
  3. As above with the pocket construction, the rick rack should sit about ” in from the raw edge of the fabric.
  4. Machine baste all four lengths of rick rack in place.

Assemble the front exterior panel to the back exterior panels

  1. Place the two back exterior panels right sides together with the front exterior panel, sandwiching the pockets between the layers.
  2. Pin along the sides only from the bottom up to the bottom “V” of the arm opening.
  3. Using a ” seam allowance, stitch each side seam from the bottom up to the top.
  4. Remember to stop and lock the seam at that bottom “V” of the arm opening on each side.
  5. Press open both seam allowances.

Make and place the back ties

  1. Find the two 3” x 16” tie strips.
  2. Fold each strip in half, right sides together, so they are now 1½” x 16”. Pin across one end and down the long side.
  3. Using a ” seam allowance, stitch across the one end and down the long side, pivoting at the corner.
  4. Clip the corners, press open the seam allowance, and turn each strip right side out through the open end. Gently push out the corners. As above with the pocket, use a long, blunt tool. Press the ties flat.
  5. Pin the raw end of each tie to the inner raw edge of each back exterior panel. The tie should sit approximately 8” down from the top raw edge of the fabric panel.
  6. Machine baste each tie in place. We basted in place with the seam of each tie facing down.

Assemble the lining panels

  1. As you did above with the exterior panels, pin a back lining panel right sides together to each side of the front lining panel.
  2. Using a ” seam allowance, stitch each side seam. Again, you are only stitching the side seams, and only from the bottom raw edge up to the “V” of the arm opening.

Sew front to back

  1. You should now have two lovely - and large - apron panels: one full exterior front and sides and one full lining front and sides.
  2. Place these two panels right sides together. Their perimeter raw edges should be flush.
  3. Pin along both inside back edges (make sure the ties are moved or pinned out of the way of the seam).
  4. Pin all along the bottom (this seam becomes the bottom hem of the apron),
  5. And pin along the arm openings where your pre-basted rick rack should be sandwiched between the layers.
  6. The top edges will remain open and raw.
  7. Using a ” seam allowance, stitch along all the pinned edges.
  8. Clip the corners and press open the seam allowances.
  9. Turn right side out through the open top. Gently push out all the corners so they are nice and sharp and pull the ties out into position, unpinning them if necessary.
  10. Press the apron flat.

Make and place the straps and the back upper band

  1. Find the two strap strips, the two front and two back upper band pieces, and the matching pieces of mid-weight interfacing. Center the interfacing on the wrong side of each strap. You are interfacing one half of each strap. You can fold the fabric strip in half and press to set a center crease to give you a guide line for the center placement of the interfacing. Center interfacing on ONE of each of the upper band pairs. Following manufacturer’s instructions, fuse each piece in place.
  2. Find the two interfaced strap strips. Cut a length of rick rack to run along the interfaced side edge of each strip.
  3. Pin the rick rack in place along what will be the outer edge of each finished strap. As above, the rick rack should sit about ” in from the raw edge of the fabric.
  4. You can machine baste the rick rack in place, however, we simply opted to pin it in place prior to folding the strap strip in half, right sides together. The rick rack is now sandwiched between the layers. Pin across one end and down the long side.
  5. Using a ” seam allowance, stitch across one end and down the long side of each strap, pivoting at the corner.
  6. Turn the straps right side out through the open end and gently push out the corners so they are nice and sharp.
  7. Find the interfaced back upper band panel. Place it right side up and flat on your work surface.
  8. Place a finished strap at either end of the upper band panel. The rick rack should be facing out, the raw end of the strap should be flush with the top raw edge of the upper band panel, and the edge of the rick rack should sit about ½” in from the raw side edge of the upper band in order to insure the rick rack does not get caught in the ” seam allowance. Pin the straps in place.
  9. Find the non-interfaced back upper band panel. Fold up the bottom raw edge ” and press well.
  10. Place the the two back upper band panels right sides together, sandwiching the straps between the layers. Pin in place along both sides and across the top – through all the layers.
  11. Using a ” seam allowance, stitch along the sides and across the top, sharply pivoting at the corners.
  12. Keep those short side seams a true ” so the rick rack is not caught up in either seam.
  13. Clip the corners and press open the seam allowances. 
  14. Turn the band right side out. Gently push out the upper corners.
  15. Find the main apron. The top raw edges, both front and back, will need to be gathered in order to fit into the upper bands.
  16. Along the front, run a double row of gathering stitches along the top raw edge through both layers.
  17. Along the back, first butt together the two panels so they meet at the center. Then, run a double raw of gathering stitches along the top raw edge across both panels. This allows you to treat the two back panels as one for final insertion into the upper band, which is easier than wrestling with two independent panels.
  18. Find the center point along the raw edge of the back upper band. Align this point with the center point where the two back panels butt together. Pin the band to the apron at this point.
  19. Gather the upper edge of apron to the width of the sewn band then fill in with pins across the width. Remember, you are pinning through both layers at the top of the apron but only through the unfolded raw edge of the upper band.
  20. Using a ” seam allowance stitch across. You are starting and stopping at the side seams of the upper band and stitching through all those layers as noted above. In the photo below, we flipped back the edge of the band just a bit so you can see the gathered layers underneath.
  21. Press the seam allowance up and pull the folded edge down over the seam allowance.
  22. Pin in place, making sure that folded edge is nice and straight and is correctly concealing the seam all the way across. Remove any visible basting stitches when the band is securely pinned.

Make and place the front upper band

  1. The front upper band is made in the same manner as the back but without any straps between the layers. Fold up the edge of the non-interfaced panel and place the two front panels right sides together. Pin along both sides and across the top.
  2. Using a ” seam allowance, stitch along both sides and across the top, pivoting at the corners.
  3. Clip the corners and press open the seam allowances.
  4. Turn the band right side out. Gently push out the upper corners.
  5. Gather up the top raw edges of the front apron panel to fit the width of the band and pin the band and the top of the apron right sides together.
  6. Stitch across through all the layers, press up the seam allowance and pull down the folded edge of the band into position, covering the seam on the lining side of the apron front.
  7. With both the front and back bands securely pinned in place, topstitch across close to the seam through all the layers. Go slowly and carefully to insure you are catching the back in this one seam. As with our edgestitching, we also prefer a slightly lengthened stitch for this type of topstitching.
  8. When both the front and back have been topstitched, check again to remove any visible basting stitches.

Insert the snaps to finish

  1. Find the S4H strap pattern. Cut a hole through the snap marking at the end of the paper pattern. Use this as a template to mark the placement for the top half of the snap on each strap.
  2. Using the setting tools, cut a hole at the marked point on each strap end and insert the snap cap through the hole from front to back.
  3. Place the back of the snap over the stud of the cap and, again using the setting tools, seal the two halves in place.
  4. Mark either end of the upper band for the placement of the opposite half of the snaps. This half should sit 1” in from the side edge of the band and ¾” up from the bottom/seamed edge of the band.
  5. Insert the opposite half of each snap at the marked points.

    NOTE: Setting snaps is easier than you might think – especially using the Dritz snaps and tools. If you are brand new to the technique, you can review our full, step-by-step tutorial on inserting metal snaps prior to starting the project.

We received compensation from Dritz® for this project, and some of the materials featured here or used in this project were provided free of charge by Dritz®.  All opinions are our own.

Contributors

Project Design: Alicia Thommas
Sample Creation: Debbie Guild

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Comments (2)

scootertn said:
scootertn's picture

Good Morning!  Just curious, I see the drawing in July 18th but the Rafflecopter lists 27 days left.

Just the cutest apron!  Love the hack.  I will want the cute pockets as well.

Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

@scootertn - Must have been a glitch with Rafflecopter. It does end on 7/18 -- we re-set and updated the Rafflecopter form. Thanks for the heads up. Thanks for lovin' the hack!