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Gypsy Romance: Patchwork Pom Pom Throw

Monday, 14 March 2011 9:00
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Today begins our Gypsy Romance Series: seven bright, bohemian projects created from Pillow & Maxfield's wonderful Gypsy Bandana fabric collection. We swirl out of the gates wrapped in a lush patchwork throw with pom pom embellishments and velvet accents. The generous 56" x 56" square features nine different fabrics arranged in an explosion of intoxicating color and pattern. Those horizontal strips are actually topstitched in place over the panel seams... so don't be scared off thinking you'll have to do teeny, accurate piecing. In signature S4H style, we make it easy to create a dynamic finished product.

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Liz's "Blissful" Triangle Mantle Cloth

Wednesday, 29 December 2010 9:00

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Life is not always square. Other geometric shapes sometimes waft through to give our brains a design challenge. I have a corner fireplace in one bedroom, which means the mantle is... a triangle. In addition, all the moldings in the house are very Arts & Crafts, so ruffles and frou-frou need not apply. After staring into the triangle corner for awhile, Alicia came up with a simple yet striking solution: a simple bound triangle with two drop panels to accentuate the heavy vertical design of the fireplace surround. Proving once again that, a) Alicia is smarter than me, and b) there's always a solution to your home décor challenge.

Fresh Linens: Layer Cake Dresser Cloth with Button Accents

Friday, 25 June 2010 9:00

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My grandmother, an immigrant from Lithuania, was an unbelievably talented seamstress. She did everything by hand, including free-hand embroidery, tatting, and crocheting. She never needed a pattern; you could just sketch something and she would create it. It was the sewing equivalent of the musician's 'hum a few bars.' Her vividly artistic creations seemed to flow from her fingers like water from a pitcher. In fact, as a young child, I thought everyone had handmade and hand-embroidered sheets and pillowcases and dresser cloths and curtains, and, and, and... I was shocked the first time I slept over at a friend's house and saw her sheets were (gasp!) plain white. My grandmother's influence is likely a big part of why I love the idea of antique linens, and why I steadfastly refuse to give up my dresser cloth.

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Father's Day: Pendleton Wool Chinook Stadium Blanket with Canvas Tote

Monday, 07 June 2010 9:00

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Dad will love this big, warm Pendleton wool blanket with its own handy canvas tote. It's the perfect compact companion to take to his favorite sporting event. The Chinook pattern is a Pendleton classic, an authentic Indian design adapted from petroglyphs found in the Columbia Gorge. When the weather breaks or the game is over, roll up the blanket, wrap it and latch it, and he's good to go. Dad could even use it to wave over his head when celebrating a touchdown or goal... in the event he's left his giant foam finger at home.

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Pendleton Wool Chipara Throw

Monday, 08 March 2010 9:00

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Welcome to the first of our Turquoise 2010 projects. We're celebrating the many shades of this great blue-green blend all year, and what better place to start than the turquoise of a classic Native American design. You could make this type of bound blanket with any combination of fabrics, but what makes ours so gorgeous is the classic Pendleton wool and the surprise texture of its coordinated corduroy binding. The beautiful weave of Pendleton wool makes their fabric striking from both the front and the back, and with this type of binding, you can display it either way to dramatic effect.

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Jazzy Ironing Board Cover

Wednesday, 03 February 2010 10:00

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You'll see from our instructional photos below that we made this jazzy ironing board cover while working in our booth at January's CHA Craft Super Show. So I don't want to hear any more whining about having no time and no space to sew. This tutorial is proof positive you can have success in the smallest of areas. An ironing board cover might seem like a rather mundane project, but think about it – you look at your ironing board a lot. Wouldn't it be easier on the eyes if it had a cheery cover?

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