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Stylish Baby Nursery: Sunny Horizons Dresser Cloth/Crib Quilt

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If you want to ease into trying your hand at quilting, this project is for you. It introduces the technique of joining together small strips to create a single large piece. We originally designed this tutorial as a little crib quilt, but decided we liked it better as a dresser cloth for our changing table. So, we omitted the batting and quilting through all the layers. So, the purists out there are hurling quilt pins at me, because without out those things it's not really quilting. I know, I know ... it'll be our little secret.

We've given you everything you need to create a quilt that looks exactly like ours. But there are oodles of fabric choices out there so feel free to have fun with your own combinations. And, feel free to use the word 'oodles' in your own sentence today!

Our sample was made for a baby girl's nursery, using the stunning Patty Young Andalucia collection. For information on where to buy, read Stylish Baby Nursery: Designing with Bold Colors & Patterns. This article also includes suggestions for creating an alternate fabric palette that would work well for a boy's nursery.

Sewing Tools You Need

Fabric and Other Supplies

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We used seven horizontal bands to make up the center of the quilt/dresser cloth. As we note the fabric yardage needed below, we will refer to them as 'band 1', 'band 2', etc., starting at band 1 on the top, down to band 7 at the bottom.

  • Fabric for band 1 and band 7: ¾ yard of 45" wide fabric: we used Patty Young's Andalucia in Fire Flowery Stripe
  • Fabric for band 2 and band 6: ¼ yard of 45" wide fabric: we used Patty Young's Andalucia in Earth Mod Dots
  • Fabric for band 3: ¼ yard of 45" wide fabric: we used Patty Young's Andalucia in Kiwi Jester
  • Fabric for band 4: ½ yard of 45" wide fabric: we used Patty Young's Andalucia in Fire Mod Blooms
  • Fabric for band 5 AND the entire back: 1½ yards of 45" wide fabric: we used Patty Young's Andalucia in Kiwi Tiny Dots
  • Fabric for quilt borders: ½ yard of 45" wide fabric: we used Patty Young "Andalucia" in Kiwi Flora
  • Lightweight batting between quilt layers (optional): 1½ yards of 45" wide quilt batting (must be a rectangle that is at least 37" width x 45" length)
  • All purpose thread
  • See-through ruler
  • Fabric pencil
  • Iron and ironing board
  • Scissors
  • Straight pins

Getting Started

  1. From the Kiwi Flora, cut two 3"x 41" strips and two 3" x 37" strips.
  2. From the Fire Flowery Stripe, cut two 9" x 33" strips.
  3. From the Fire Mod Blooms, cut one 13" x 33" strip.
  4. From the Kiwi Tiny Dots, cut one 4" x 33" strip.
  5. From the Kiwi Jester, cut one 4" x 33" strip.
  6. From the Earth Mod Dots, cut two 4" x 33" strips.
  7. Also from the Kiwi Tiny Dots, cut one 37" x 45" piece.

At Your Sewing Machine & Ironing Board

  1. Locate one Fire Flowery Stripe 9" x 33" strip and one 4" x 33" Earth Mod Dots strip.
  2. Stitch these two pieces, right sides together, along the 33" side using a ½” seam allowance.
  3. Press the seam allowance toward the darker fabric (because you are less likely to see it behind the darker fabric).
  4. Following the quilt center diagram below (or making up your own fabric combos), continue to add pieces in the same manner to create the 33" x 41" quilt center. Press all of the seams allowances toward the darker fabric.
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  5. Add a 3" x 41" Kiwi Flora strip to each side of the quilt center. Match the raw edges, pin and stitch, right sides together, making a ½" seam along the 41" side. Remember to remove pins as you go; don't sew over them. Press the seam allowances toward the quilt center. You now have a piece measuring 37" x 41".
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  6. Add a 3" x 37" Kiwi Flora fabric strip to the top and bottom of the quilt center. Match raw edges, pin and stitch, right sides together, making a ½" seam along the 37" side. Remember to remove pins as you go; don't sew over them. Press the sea allowances toward the quilt center. You will have nice, right angles at all four corners.
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  7. You have completed the quilt top; it should measure 37" x 45".
  8. Place the Kiwi Tiny Dots 37" x 45" backing fabric and the finished quilt top right sides together. Pin in place.
  9. Stitch around all four sides using a ½" seam allowance, removing the pins as you go so you don't stitch over them, and leaving an 6-8" opening for turning.
  10. Turn right side out and press, making sure your opening's seam allowance in pressed to the inside.
  11. Slip stitch the opening closed.

    Hints and Tips

    Adapt The Dresser Cloth Into A Crib Quilt

    Follow all the steps above as-is until you get to Step 8 in At Your Sewing Machine. Complete as follows:

    1. Place the Kiwi Tiny Dots 37" x 45" backing fabric and the finished quilt top right sides together with the batting sandwiched in between. Pin in place through all three layers.
    2. Stitch around all four sides using a ½" seam allowance, removing the pins as you go so you don't stitch over them, and leaving an 6-8" opening for turning.
    3. Within the seam allowance, trim the batting close to the seam.
    4. Turn right side out and press, making sure your opening's seam allowance in pressed to the inside.
    5. Slip stitch the opening closed.
    6. Topstitch ½" in from the egdge on all sides.
    7. To quilt all the layers together, sew along each horizontal seam within your top piece. This is called 'stitching in the ditch' because you are actually following the seam line (the ditch) with your new line of stitching.
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    Finished, showing back side.

    The steps above are the simplest way to quilt your layers. If you want to get fancy, you could add more parallel lines of stitching within each stripe or even the decorative swirls and curves of free-hand stippling. But .... that's a whole 'nother can of quilting worms, and those purists are going to throw more pins at me if I gloss over the steps. So, for now, I'm considering this a very basic tutorial and the perfect way to dip your toe into the wonderful world of quilting. (Once you wade in and are immersed in it, no one will throw pins at you any more.)

    Contributors
    Project Design: Alicia Thommas
    Sample Creation: Aimee McGaffey
    Instructional Editing: Alison Newman

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    Comments (5)

    Mary R said:
    Mary R's picture

    When I measure the templates after printing them out they are only 63/4" square, the corner scallop is not  61/2"x almost 63/4" and the edge scallop is 61/2"x61/2" do I use these templates or do I have to remake them to be exactly 7"?

    Mary R said:
    Mary R's picture

    Nevermind, my printer wasn't set to actual size.

     

    Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
    Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture

    @ Mary R... Yay! Have fun with the project. 

    Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home said:
    Liz Johnson.Editor.Sew4Home's picture
    Hi Molly P - If you only stitch the batting to the quilt top, the back won't be secure. The quilting is meant to go through all the layers in order to keep the layers from shifting. So, I'm not sure how big your quilt is, but unless it's quite small, you shouldn't try to just quilt the batting to the top and then hope the binding will keep everything from shifting. Hope that helps.smilies/cheesy.gif
    Molly P said:
    Molly P's picture
    Hi,
    I'm making the crib bedding set using most of the patterns found on this web side. I'm making a quilt kind of like this one. I'm using left over fabric from my other projects to make a quilt. The center of the quilt is made of 12 square fabric pieces with a border on the out side. I'm going to use warm and naural quilt batting and I know you have to stitch into the quilt every 10 inches or less. My question is can I just stitch the batting to the edges of the patches and not the fabric on the reverse other side. The fabric on the reverse side is all one piece and I didn't want to sew into that. Thanks.

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